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Abstracts of articles from magazine Suara Serangga Papua (SUGAPA)

of Kelompok Entomologi Papua (Workgroup Papua Insects)

(Voice of Papuan Insects)

(ISSN 1978-9807)

[updated on 22nd March 2014]


SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua)

An entomological journal which is the scientific and professional continuation of the newsletter series (see below).

For more information click here.

You can download a subscription form here! (return by postal mail or as attachment with email)

 

 

SUGAPA is sponsored by The Van Tienhoven Foundation and by Bank Rakyat Indonesia (BRI)

Abstracts of Magazine SUGAPA:

Select a volume: Volume 3(1): July-September 2008; Volume 3(2): October-December 2008; Volume 3(3): January-March 2009; Volume 3(4): April-June 2009; Volume 4(1): July-September 2009; Volume 4(2): October-December 2009; Volume 4(3): January-March 2010; Volume 4(4): April-June 2010; Volume 5(1): July-September 2010; Volume 5(2): October-December 2010; Volume 5(3): January-March 2011; Volume 5(4): April-June 2011; Volume 6(1): July-September 2011; Volume 6(2): October-December 2011; Volume 6(3): January-March 2012; Volume 6(4): April-June 2012; Volume 7(1): July-September 2012; Volume 7(2): October-December 2012; Volume 7(3): January-March 2013; Volume 7(4): April-June 2013; Volume 8(1): July-September 2013; Volume 8(2): October-December 2013; Volume 8(3): January-March 2014

 


 

 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 8(3): January - March 2014

Content of this volume:

Rob de Vos - Three taxa from Hulstaert (1924) transfered from Arctiinae (Erebidae) to Lacturidae and Immidae (Lepidoptera) and synonymised

Henk van Mastrigt - A review of the status of some Delias Hübner, 1819 (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) in Papua, Indonesia. 3. Notes on some recent publications

Rob de Vos & Merel M. van Haren - A new Spilosoma species found in the Arfak Mountains, Papua Barat, Indonesia and Immetalia mokndoma transfered to Spilosoma (Lepidoptera: Erebidae, Arctiinae, Arctiini)

Frans Groenen - The Papuan Tortricidae Fauna: Opphiorrhabda mormopa (Meyrick, 1906) (Lepidoptera) a new leafroller for Papua

 

 

 

 

Three taxa from Hulstaert (1924) transfered from Arctiinae (Erebidae) to Lacturidae and Immidae (Lepidoptera) and synonymised - Rob de Vos

 

 

Darantoides lineolata Hulstaert, 1924 and D. plagiata Hulstaert, 1924, currently placed in the Lithosiini (Erebidae, Arctiinae), are found to belong to the Lacturidae. Darantoides lineolata Hulstaert, 1924 syn. nov. is synonymized with Lactura pyronympha Meyrick, 1923 and Darantoides plagiata Hulstaert, 1924 syn. nov. is synonymised with Lactura pyrilampis (Meyrick, 1886). Dichrostoptera basilinea Hulstaert, 1924 syn. nov., currently placed in the Lithosiini (Erebidae, Arctiinae), is found to belong to the Immidae and is synonymised with Bursadella timetica (Durrant, 1915). The genus Dichrostoptera Hulstaert, 1924 syn. nov. is a junior synonym of Bursadella Snellen, 1880.

 

 

 

 

 

A review of the status of some Delias Hübner, 1819 (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) in Papua, Indonesia. 3. Notes on some recent publications - Henk van Mastrigt

Over the last twenty years a number of papers have been published in which taxa of Delias have been revised, synonymised, given a new status or used in a new combination. In this article these revisions are summarised and evaluated in order to arrive at an updated classification of all Delias in Papua.

 

 

A new Spilosoma species found in the Arfak Mountains, Papua Barat, Indonesia and Immetalia mokndoma transfered to Spilosoma (Lepidoptera: Erebidae, Arctiinae, Arctiini) - Rob de Vos & Merel M. van Haren

 

 

A new species in the subfamily Arctiinae is described, Spilosoma sinnemorum spec. nov. It is the only known specimen so far of this species and was found in the Arfak Mountains during a recent expedition in 2011 by Mrs Jannie and Mr Siep Sinnema. The genitalia and habitus of the imago are depicted. Immetalia mokndoma De Vos, 2013 (originally Noctuidae, Agaristinae) is transferred from Immetalia Jordan, 1896 to Spilosoma Curtis, 1825 (Erebidae, Arctiinae, Arctiini) and appears to be closely allied.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Papuan Tortricidae Fauna: Opphiorrhabda mormopa (Meyrick, 1906) (Lepidoptera) a new leafroller for Papua - Frans Groenen

 

 

Opphiorrhabda mormopa is reported for the first time from the Papuan province of Indonesia. Information about the distribution and possible foodplants is given.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 8(2): October - December 2013

[erroneously "Volume 8(1)" is printed on the front cover]

Content of this volume:

Stefan Schröder - Notes on West Papuan (Indonesian) Hypochrysops C. & R. Felder, 1860 (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae)

Henk van Mastrigt - A new species of Hypolycaena (C. & R. Felder, 1862) from Papua, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae)

Henk van Mastrigt - A review of the status of some Delias Hübner, 1819 (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) in Papua, Indonesia. 2. Taxonomic revisions by Yagishita (1993) and Parsons (1999)

 

 

 

 

Notes on West Papuan (Indonesian) Hypochrysops C. & R. Felder, 1860 (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) - Stefan Schröder

 

 

 

Hypochrysops fuscus spec. nov., a new species of the Hypochrysops theon-group is described from Sorong in NW West Papua and new distributional records of H. elgneri, H. castaneus, H. arronica, and H. hippurus are given.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A new species of Hypolycaena (C. & R. Felder, 1862) from Papua, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) - Henk van Mastrigt

 

 

 

Hypolycaena daawiae spec. nov. is described from Biak, a new species which is allied to H. danis.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A review of the status of some Delias Hübner, 1819 (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) in Papua, Indonesia. 2. Taxonomic revisions by Yagishita (1993) and Parsons (1999) - Henk van Mastrigt

Over the years, many taxa of Delias have been revised, synonymised, given a new status or used in a new combination. Most but not all of these revisions have been formalized by later authors. In this publication the status of about thirty taxa revised by Yagishita (1993) and Parsons (1999) are examined and clarified.

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 8(1): July - September 2013

Content of this volume:

Stefan Naumann - Notes on the genus Pararhodia Cockerell, 1914 with description of two new species from mainland of New Guinea (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae)

Mike Wild - First record of a female Delias neeltje (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

Henk van Mastrigt - A review of Delias rileyi (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) in Papua, Indonesia

 

 

 

 

Notes on the genus Pararhodia Cockerell, 1914 with description of two new species from mainland of New Guinea (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) - Stefan Naumann

 

 

 

A short overview of the history and the so far described taxa within the solely Papuan genus Pararhodia is given and potential synonymies are discussed briefly. P. acuminalba stat. nov. van Eecke, 1924 is raised to species level. Two taxa are described as new to science: P. hiltrautae spec. nov. from Arfak Mts, West Papua Prov. in the Indonesian part of NG and P. ulrichi spec. nov. from the Southwestern parts of Papua New Guinea, with colour pictures and a map. Finally, an updated checklist for the genus Pararhodia is presented.

 

 

 

 

 

First record of a female Delias neeltje (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) - Mike Wild

 

 

 

 

The previously unknown female Delias neeltje, recorded from Mokndoma, Papua, is described and illustrated. Comparison is made between D. neeltje and the closely allied D. clathrata from PNG.

 

 

 

 

 

A review of Delias rileyi (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) in Papua, Indonesia - Henk van Mastrigt

 

 

 

 

The taxonomic history of Delias rileyi Joicey & Talbot (1922) is presented with some comments. A comparison of diagnostic features of the various subspecies results in a new synonym.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 7(4): April - June 2013

Content of this volume:

Henk van Mastrigt & Mike Wild - The environment of Mokndoma and its Delias (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

Rob de Vos - Two new Spilosoma species from Indonesian New Guinea (Erebidae, Arctiinae, Arctiini)

Rob de Vos - Three new Agaristinae species and the first record of Argyrolepidia palaea from Papua, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Agaristinae)

 

 

 

 

 

Revision of status of some Delias Hübner, 1819 (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) in Papua, Indonesia, 1. D'Abrera's Revisions - Henk van Mastrigt & Mike Wild

 

 

 

The results of collecting at Mokndoma and its close environments are presented, focussed on the genus Delias. including the description of the female of D. cyclosticha (new to science) and a form of D. phippsi mulia. Besides that, a general description is presented of the area of the Wano people with an impression of the entomologic fauna, completed with a few maps and some pictures of butterflies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two new Spilosoma species from Indonesian New Guinea (Erebidae, Arctiinae, Arctiini) - Rob de Vos

 

 

 

Two new species of the genus Spilosoma Butler, 1875 are described from Indonesian New Guinea: Spilosoma wildi spec. nov. and S. withaari spec. nov. (see picture). The species are described and the moths and genitalia are figured.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three new Agaristinae species and the first record of Argyrolepidia palaea from Papua, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Agaristinae) - Rob de Vos

 

 

 

Two new species in the genus Argyrolepidia Hampson, 1901 and one in the genus Immetalia Jordan, 1896 (see picture) are described from Indonesian New Guinea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Agaristinae). Argyrolepidia azurea is compared with the similar A. lunaris Rothschild & Jordan, 1905. Furthermore a first record of Argyrolepidia palaea Rothschild & Jordan, 1905 is reported for Papua, Indonesia. The new species are depicted including the genitalia.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 7(3): January - March 2013

Content of this volume:

Henk van Mastrigt - Revision of status of some Delias Hübner, 1819 (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) in Papua, Indonesia, 1. D'Abrera's Revisions.

Gerrit Withaar - Four new species of the genus Tmesisternus Latreille, 1829 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Tmesisternini) from Papua and Sulawesi.

Frans Groenen - The Papuan Tortricidae-Fauna (Lepidoptera): Dicephalarcha sicca Diakonoff, 1973 (Olethreutinae: Olethreutini) new for Papua.

Ian J. Kitching - A new species of Cypa from New Guinea (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae, Smerinthinae).

 

 

 

 

 

Revision of status of some Delias Hübner, 1819 (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) in Papua, Indonesia, 1. D'Abrera's Revisions - Henk van Mastrigt

 

 

 

Over the years, many taxa of Delias have been revised, synonymized, given a new status or used in a new combination. Most but not all of these revisions have been formalized by later authors. In this publication the status of seventeen taxa synonymized by D'Abrera (1971, 1977, 1990) are examined and clarified.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Four new species of the genus Tmesisternus Latreille, 1829 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Tmesisternini) from Papua and Sulawesi - Gerrit Withaar

 

 

 

Four species, new to science, of the genus Tmesisternus Latreille, 1829 are described. Two species, Tmesisternus wasiorensis and T. mokwamensis, originate from Papua, Indonesia, two other species, Tmesisternus glabrum and T. sexcostatus are from Sulawesi, Indonesia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Papuan Tortricidae-Fauna (Lepidoptera): Dicephalarcha sicca Diakonoff, 1973 (Olethreutinae: Olethreutini) new for Papua - Frans Groenen

 

Dicephalarcha sicca Diakonoff, 1973 (Olethreutinae: Olethreutini) was only known from Java and is herewith reported as new for Papua, Indonesia.

 

 

 

 

 

A new species of Cypa from New Guinea (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae, Smerinthinae) - Ian J. Kitching

 

 

A new species of the hawkmoth genus Cypa, Cypa moniensis spec. nov., is described based on a single male from Bilogai, in the Central Mountain Range of Papua province, Indonesia. It is easily distinguished from all other members of the genus by features of the habitus and the male genitalia. A checklist of species in the genus is also provided.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 7(2): October - December 2012

Content of this volume:

Henk van Mastrigt & Chris Davenport - Some notes on Delias albertisi (Oberthür, 1880) (Lepidoptera: Pieridae).

Mark Goode - Notes on Papilio albinus Wallace, 1865 (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) from Papua, Indonesia including descriptions of new subspecies.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some notes on Delias albertisi (Oberthür, 1880) (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) - Henk van Mastrigt & Chris Davenport

 

 

 

The original description of Delias albertisi discoides Talbot, 1937 was based on a single female. The male is now described from the same locality in the Cyclops Mountains near Jayapura, Papua, Indonesia and the male and female are pictured for the first time. In addition, the status of two other subspecies, D. albertisi putih and D. albertisi tamamitsui, are re-classified as D. putih putih Van Mastrigt, 1996 stat. nov. and D. putih tamamitsui Morita, 1996 comb. nov.

 

 

 

 

 

Notes on Papilio albinus Wallace, 1865 (Lepidoptera: Papilionidae) from Papua, Indonesia including descriptions of new subspecies - Mark Goode

 

 

 

Three new subspecies of Papilio albinus Wallace, 1865 are described from Papua, Indonesia, with the status of the taxon Papilio albinus var. leucophanes Grose-Smith, 1894 revised as being representative of a distinctive subspecies of Papilio albinus Wallace, 1865. Details pertaining to the general ecology and taxonomy of the species are also discussed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 7(1): July - September 2012

Content of this volume:

Henk van Mastrigt - Inventory of Delias Hübner, 1819 (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) from the western Star Mountains, Papua, Indonesia.

F. [Frans] Groenen - The Papuan Tortricidae-Fauna (Lepidoptera): A new species of the genus Icelita Bradley, 1957 (Olethreutinae: Eucosmini).

 

 

 

 

 

Inventory of Delias Hübner, 1819 (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) from the western Star Mountains, Papua, Indonesia - Henk van Mastrigt

 

 

An inventory of species of the genus Delias in the western Star Mountains is presented and comparison is made with records from the eastern Star Mountains in PNG. The subspecific classification of seven species is reviewed and changes are proposed to the following taxa; D. frater soror comb. nov., D. frater far comb. nov., D. luctuosa versicolor syn. nov., D. luctuosa kuning syn. nov., D. iltis bultemensis syn. nov., D. hemianops felis stat. nov., D. roepkei pellos syn. nov. and D. niepelti henki syn. nov.

 

 

 

 

 

The Papuan Tortricidae-Fauna (Lepidoptera): A new species of the genus Icelita Bradley, 1957 (Olethreutinae: Eucosmini) - Frans Groenen

 

 

One new Olethreutinae species, Icelita papuarana spec. nov. is described from Papua, Indonesia. Some additional descriptions of characters of the related I. tatarana Bradley, 1957 are compared with the new species.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 6(4): April - June 2012

Content of this volume:

Mark Goode & Danny Burk - Some notes on Papilio lorquinianus C. & R. Felder, 1865 (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae) in Papua, Indonesia, with the description of a new subspecies.

Rob de Vos - Revised generic position of the Palaeosia and Calamidia related species in New Guinea (Erebidae, Arctiinae, Lithosiini).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some notes on Papilio lorquinianus C. & R. Felder, 1865 (Lepidoptera, Papilionidae) in Papua, Indonesia, with the description of a new subspecies - Mark Goode & Danny Burk

 

 

 

A new subspecies of Papilio lorquinianus C. & R. Felder, 1865 is described from the foothills of the Van Rees Mountains, Papua Province, Indonesia; additionally, a recent capture of Papilio lorquinianus dewaro Joicey & Talbot, 1922 is confirmed from the Jamur Lake area of Papua.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revised generic position of the Palaeosia and Calamidia related species in New Guinea (Erebidae, Arctiinae, Lithosiini) - Rob de Vos

 

 

The generic position of four species which were traditionally placed in either Palaeosia Hampson, 1900 or Calamidia Butler, 1877 is revised. It turned out that Palaeosia and Calamidia are endemic to Australia and that the species in New Guinea belong to three other genera of which two are new: Oeonosia Hampson, 1914, Semicalamidia gen. nov. and Neosyntaxis gen. nov.
Calamidia castanea Rothschild, 1912 syn. nov. is synonymized with Ilema owgarra Bethune-Baker, 1908, Calamidia reticulata Rothschild, 1912 syn. nov. is synonymized with Palaeosia longistriga Bethune-Baker, 1908, Calamidia warringtonella goliathina Rothschild, 1912 syn. nov. is synonymized with Ilema warringtonella Bethune-Baker, 1908 s.str. and two new species, Oeonosia cruda spec. nov. and O. abenaho spec. nov., are described. Striosia irrorata (Rothschild, 1912) is compared with the treated species.

 

 


 


 

 

 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 6(3): January - March 2012

Content of this volume:

Henk van Mastrigt - Review of Delias hypomelas group on New Guinea (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

Stefan Schröder - ”Felder’s Hedge Blue”- Lycaenopsis haraldus (Fabricius 1787) - recorded
from Papua, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Review of Delias hypomelas group on New Guinea (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) - Henk van Mastrigt

 

 

 

The relationship of Delias hypomelas Rothschild & Jordan, 1907 and Delias argentata Roepke, 1955 is reviewed, resulting in synonymization all D. hypomelas subspecies with the nominate species and re- classification of D. argentata and D. destrigata as forms of D. hypomelas. The distribution of all forms of D. hypomelas, on the mainland of New Guinea (Papua and Papua New Guinea together) is also summarised.

 

 

 

 

 

”Felder’s Hedge Blue”- Lycaenopsis haraldus (Fabricius 1787) - recorded from Papua, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) - Stefan Schröder

 

 

 

Lycaenopsis haraldus (Fabricius, 1787) is recorded for the first time in Papua. No records of this species were known from the region east of Sundaland before and the species has never been mentioned from Maluku or from Papua New Guinea.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 6(2): October - December 2011

Content of this volume:

Henk van Mastrigt & Chris Davenport - Some notes on Delias bornemanni - nais complex on Papua and Papua New Guinea mainland (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

Rawati Panjaitan - Komunitas Kupu-Kupu Superfamili Papilionoidea (Lepidoptera) di Kawasan Hutan Wisata Alam Gunung Meja, Manokwari, Papua Barat

 

 

 

 

 

Some notes on Delias bornemanni - nais complex on Papua and Papua New Guinea mainland (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) - Henk van Mastrigt & Chris Davenport

 

 

Members of the Delias bornemanni - nais complex are widely distributed throughout the central mountains of New Guinea from the Kobowre Mts in the West to the Owen Stanley Range in the East. No less than fifteen taxon names have been used to describe the varieties, of which nine are now considered to be synonyms. A historical account of the taxonomy is presented with additional comments that clarify the systematics and include the description of a new subspecies of D. nais from the Foja Mts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Komunitas Kupu-Kupu Superfamili Papilionoidea (Lepidoptera) di Kawasan Hutan Wisata Alam Gunung Meja, Manokwari, Papua Barat ["Butterfly Community of Superfamily Papilionoidea (Lepidoptera) at Gunung Meja Recreational Forest Area, Manokwari, Papua Barat"] - Rawati Panjaitan

 

Gunung Meja, a forest area near Manokwari, West Papua province, has been designated as a recreational forest since 1980. Gunung Meja covers 460.25 ha and is located at 75 - 175 m asl. Gunung Meja is directly adjacent to residential areas, so that the community activities, such as felling trees and gardening are often conducted in the area. These can interfere with the existence of flora and fauna inside, including butterflies. To assess the impact of intrusive human activities on the forest area, it is necessary to obtain basic information about what flora and fauna are present. This study aims to record the butterfly community in the area. Observations of butterflies were done by scan sampling on primary forest, secondary forest, gardens and settlements. Sampling and measurement of environmental parameters were performed in the morning and afternoon for seven weeks. This study recorded 113 species and 4.049 individuals of butterflies. There were 75 species in primary forest, 77 species in secondary forest, and 63 species in gardens and settlements. The number of species found continued to increase until the last day of the observation. Shannon-Wiener index (H’) calculation showed that diversity in primary and secondary forests were 3.48 and 3.50, respectively, thus classified as high (H’ > 3). Sorensen index calculation (CN) showed high value reaching 0.5 quantitatively.

 

 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 6(1): July - September 2011

Content of this volume:

Gerrit Withaar - Four new species of the genus Tmesisternus Latreille, 1829 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Tmesisternini), from New Guinea

Evie Lilly Warikar - Study diversity of log dependent beetles (Coleoptera) in District of Bonggo, Regency of Sarmi, Province of Papua, Indonesia

Beatrix I.S. Wanma - Peran Lutein dan Flavanoid pada Kupu-kupu (Lepidoptera)

Henk van Mastrigt - Review of revised edition (2010) of Mimika Butterflies, a guide to the butterflies of the Mimika Region of Papua

 

 

 

 

Four new species of the genus Tmesisternus Latreille, 1829 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Tmesisternini), from New Guinea - Gerrit Withaar

 

 

 

Four species, new to science, of the genus Tmesisternus Latreille, 1829 are described. Three species originate from Papua, Indonesia: Tmesisternus abmisibilis, T. bodemensis and T. bazuini. One species, T. lordbergia is found in Papua New Guinea.

 

 

 

 

 

Study diversity of log dependent beetles (Coleoptera) in District of Bonggo, Regency of Sarmi, Province of Papua, Indonesia - Evie Lilly Warikar

A research was conducted to inventory the diversity of beetles in logged areas in the District of Bonggo, Jayapura, Papua. The survey was held for 34 consecutive days in three selected study areas. The cross-wet trap was used for collecting beetles, resulting in 1,751 individuals, recognized as 219 species, representing 21 different families. Comparisons between the three different sites and four genera of trees are presented.

Peran Lutein dan Flavanoid pada Kupu-kupu (Lepidoptera) ["The role of luteine and flavanoids in butterflies"] - Beatrix I.S. Wanma

Lepidoptera are divided into two large groups, butterflies and moths. Colouration is one of the features that help to separate the members these groups. The colours of adult butterflies are associated with pterin pigments, interference of light and carotenoids. During the larval stage, carotenoids are more dominant than in the other phases of the life cycle. The functions of carotenoids in butterflies include antioxidant behaviour, colour formation and production of silk which can be used in industrial world. The purpose of this paper is to provide information about the role of the carotenoid lutein and the flavanoids in butterflies.

 

 

 

Review of revised edition (2010) of Mimika Butterflies, a guide to the butterflies of the Mimika Region of Papua - Henk van Mastrigt

A beautiful book, printed on glossy, thick paper (the weight of book is 650 gr.) with high quality pictures, a pleasure for everybody who likes to study or observe butterflies in the Mimika Region. The book was first published by PT Freeport Indonesia Biodiversity Centre in Timika in 2001, this revised second edition has recently been published by PT Freeport Indonesia Environmental Department in Kuala Kencana, Timika, printed on slightly different and lighter paper (weight 550 gr.). See also Literature.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 5(4): April - June 2011

Content of this volume:

Rob de Vos - Nicetosoma gen. nov., a new genus for the “Spilosomaniceta group of species East of the Weber Line (Lepidoptera: Erebidae, Arctiinae, Arctiini)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nicetosoma gen. nov., a new genus for the “Spilosomaniceta group of species East of the Weber Line (Lepidoptera: Erebidae, Arctiinae, Arctiini) - Rob de Vos

 

 

A new genus name is proposed for the niceta group of 9 species which previously was considered to belong to Spilosoma Curtis, 1825. Two new species are described, Nicetosoma meforensis spec. nov. and Nicetosoma sulphurata spec. nov. The following taxonomic changes are proposed: Diacrisia niceta intermedia Rothschild, 1910 syn. nov., Diacrisia niceta mysolica Rothschild, 1915 syn. nov. and Diacrisia niceta pallida syn. nov. are synonymized with Diacrisia niceta papuana Rothschild, 1910, which itself will be raised from subspecies level to species level as Nicetosoma papuana (Rothschild, 1910) stat. nov. and the same is done with Diacrisia niceta saturata Rothschild, 1910 to Nicetosoma saturata (Rothschild, 1910) stat. nov.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 5(3): January-March 2011

Content of this volume:

Henk van Mastrigt - The butterflies of the Genus Delias Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) in the Pass Valley, Papua, Indonesia

Carlo Arrigo & Francesco Vitali - Faunistic notes about an entomological survey to Kepulauan Biak, Papua (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)

John Kaize & Vincent J. Kalkman - Records of dragonflies (Odonata) from Kabupaten Asmat and Kabupaten Mappi (Papua, Indonesia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The butterflies of the Genus Delias Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) in the Pass Valley, Papua, Indonesia - Henk van Mastrigt

The records of Delias species encountered by the author and his assistants are presented in this paper, showing quite some differences with the records from the very close Baliem Valley. On the other hand a link is suggested with Abmisibil in the Star Mountains. Additionally, some notes and comments are made on individual species, including a syn. nov.

 

Faunistic notes about an entomological survey to Kepulauan Biak, Papua (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) - Carlo Arrigo & Francesco Vitali

Five species of cerambycids collected during an entomological survey done by the former author to Kepulauan Biak, Papua (Indonesia) are examined. Acalolepta magnetica auripilis (Matsushita, 1935) is new from the island of New Guinea, Strongylurus aequatorius (Gressitt, 1959) and Parepepeotes togatus togatus (Perris, 1855) are new from Kepulauan Biak.

 

Records of dragonflies (Odonata) from Kabupaten Asmat and Kabupaten Mappi (Papua, Indonesia) - John Kaize & Vincent J. Kalkman

Records of dragonflies collected at Katan and Senggo (both Kabupaten Mappi) and at Vriendschap River (Kabupaten Asmat) in 2009 are presented. In total 47 species belonging to seven families were collected, the majority of these belong to the Coenagrionidae (14 species) or to Libellulidae (26 species). The collection includes several poorly known species such as Plagulibasis ciliata and Nososticta rangifera. Austrocnemis maccullochi is recorded for Indonesia for the first time. One male of an undescribed Palaiargia is briefly characterized but is not officially described.


 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 5(2): October-December 2010

Content of this volume:

 

Henk van Mastrigt - The butterflies of the Genus Delias Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) in the Baliem Valley

John Kaize & Vincent J. Kalkman - On a collection of dragonflies (Odonata) from the Island of Mioswaar (Papua Barat, Indonesia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The butterflies of the Genus Delias Hübner (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) in the Baliem Valley - Henk van Mastrigt

 

 

 

The records of Delias species encountered by the Archbold III Expedition (1938-1939) in the area of the Baliem Valley and upwards are reviewed and comparison is made with more recent collecting results presented in this paper. Additionally, some notes and comments are made on individual species, including a stat. nov. and three comb. nov.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On a collection of dragonflies (Odonata) from the Island of Mioswaar (Papua Barat, Indonesia) - John Kaize & Vincent J. Kalkman

 

 

 

 

A total of 28 species of dragonflies were collected during fieldwork from the 18th to 27th of August 2009. One of these (Argiolestes roon) has since been described as new to science while several others are still undescribed (Argiolestes spec.) or might be new to science. This small collection shows that the Island of Mioswaar has a rich and diverse dragonfly fauna comparable with that of the mainland. A number of the species have their main range or their nearest relatives on the Bird’s Head Peninsula showing that the dragonfly fauna of Mioswaar is more related with that of the Bird’s Head than with that of the vast other part of the mainland of New Guinea.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 5(1): July-September 2010

Content of this volume:

 

Henk van Mastrigt - Cyrestis acilia (Godart, 1819) in Papua, Indonesia: its distribution, subspecies and forms (Lepidoptera: Apaturinae, Nymphalidae)

Santhi Kanony - The diversity and distribution of Nymphalid butterflies at the river site, gardens and forest, at Malawor village, District Makbon, Kabupaten Sorong, Papua Barat Province (in Bahasa Indonesia)

Tirza Natalia Agaki - The diversity of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata) at the inlet and outlet of the Sentani Lake (in Bahasa Indonesia)

Alfred Kharum Wayeni - Study on the diversity of butterflies of the Superfamily Papilionoidea in District Supiori Barat, Kabupaten Supiori (in Bahasa Indonesia)

Yarius Pakage - The exploiration of the diversity of stick insects Order Phasmida in the Natural Reserve of the Cyclops Mountains, Kabupaten Jayapura (in Bahasa Indonesia)

 

 

 

 

Cyrestis acilia (Godart, 1819) in Papua, Indonesia: its distribution, subspecies and forms (Lepidoptera: Apaturinae, Nymphalidae) - Henk van Mastrigt

 

 

The taxonomic history of Cyrestis acilia (Godart, 1819), including all described subspecies is summarised. The distribution and current classification of populations within the Indonesian province of Papua and nearby islands is presented. Two new subspecies are here described and one subspecies is recognised as separate species.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The diversity and distribution of Nymphalid butterflies at the river site, gardens and forest, at Malawor village, District Makbon, Kabupaten Sorong, Papua Barat Province - Santhi Kanony

 

 

This survey studies the diversity and distribution of Nymphalid butterflies at three different sites at the Malawor village, District Makbon, Kabupaten of Sorong, Papua Barat Province. One site is along the banks of the river Klamani, the second in a garden area and the third in the forest.
The transect count method was used for this survey and all species of Nymphalid butterflies in the above mentioned area were the object of study. For the analysis of the data the Index diversity of Shannon (H') was used, for the Equivalence Evenness (e) and for the Index Similarity the Coefficient of Sorensen (CCs).
The survey recorded 46 species of Nymphalid butterflies in total, 33 species along the river, 33 species in the forest and 15 species in the garden area.The highest diversity according to the Shannon Wiener Index was found in the forest site (H'=1.22 and e=0.80); the lowest was found in the garden site (H'=0.82 and e=0.70).
The results of the survey are presented as a table - and Henk van Mastrigt has added some notes on Junonia atlites, one of the most common species in the garden area, and a very dark form of Hypolimnas alimena.

 

 

 

 

The diversity of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata) at the inlet and outlet of the Sentani Lake - Tirza Natalia Agaki

The aim of this study was to know the diversity of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata) at the inlet and outlet area of the Sentani Lake. Data were recorded during 32 days (from 19 September till 20 October 2009) in the environment of the Sentani Lake, Jayapura. The analysis of data was done from the end of October till December 2009. The used methods were observation, Count Transect method at Transect Line and documentation.
The result of the survey -at all localities both at inlet as at outlet- consists of 449 specimens, representing 44 species in ten families. At the two inlet areas 298 specimens were recorded representing 35 species in 10 families: 16 species ofthe Family Libelullidae, 11 species of the Coenagrionidae, and 1 species each of the Gomphidae, Aeshnidae, Cordulidae, Calopterygidae, Chlorochypidae, Protoneuridae, Platycnimididae and Platystictidae. At the single outlet area of the Sentani Lake 151 specimens were recorded representing 30 species in seven families: 13 species of the Family Libellulidae, 9 species of the Coenagrionidae, 3 species of the Protoneuridae, and 1 species each of the Gomphidae, Aeshnidae, Chlorocyphidae, and Platystictidae.
The result shows that the diversity of Odonata at the inlet area is higher in comparison with the diversity at the outlet area; the equity of species in inlet and outlet areas is about the same (ISs = 64.61 %). Anisoptera species were more common at open and sunny river sites; Zygoptera were more often found close to bushes and trees at the river banks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Study on the diversity of butterflies of the Superfamily Papilionoidea in District Supiori Barat, Kabupaten Supiori - Alfred Kharum Wayeni

The aim of this study was to get an actual list concerning the diversity and distribution of butterflies (Superfamily Papilionoidea) at the Maudori village, District Supiori Barat, Kabupaten Supiori. Besides that special attention should be paid on endemic species. The survey was held during two weeks, from 6 till 19 August, 2007, using the Count transect method at Transect Line which was repeated so long the number of species still increased. Collecting data was finished after no increase was found anymore.
The survey resulted in 66 species, consisting of 9 species Papilionidae, 8 species Pieridae, 15 species Lycaenidae and 34 species Nymphalidae. Only within the nymphalids was still an increase in the number till the last day, so that an increase of the number was well possible in a longer period.
During the survey 51 species were observed at Maudori village, 39 species at Siwen and at Napisndi 38 species. The Index diversity for the whole area is 1.70, which is still in the middle category; for the village Maudori it is 1.63; for Napisndi 1.60 and for Siwen 1.58, which figures are all in the same middle category. The difference in the diversity index between the three localities is caused by different habitat, different altitude and the avaible food plants. tipe habitat, luas lokasi, ketinggian lokasi dan juga ketersediaan sumber pakan.
The Index Similarity of the three localities is quite high: for Maudori and Siwen it is 0.64; for Maudori and Napisndi 0.63 and for Siwen and Napisndi 0.60, which is caused by the close distance between the three localities.
During this survey some endemic species for the Cenderawasih Bay islands were recorded as Pareronia chinki, Delias talboti, Ideopsis hewitsonii, Taenaris scylla and Cirrochroa imperatrix.

 

 

 

 

The exploiration of the diversity of stick insects Order Phasmida in the Natural Reserve of the Cyclops Mountains, Kabupaten Jayapura - Yarius Pakage

A survey on diversity, habitat and food plants of Phasmida in the Natural Reserve of the Cyclops Mountains (CAPC = Cagar Alam Pegunungan Cyclops) was held during two months, from June 28 to August 29, 2008, using transect line. Technique of collecting was according to instructions of the Phasmida Study Project in Switzerland. Members of four subfamilies of Phasmida were recorded: Eurycanthinae (6 species), Necrosciinae (2 species), Phasmatinae (1 species), and Platycraninae (1 species), all included in the family Phasmatidae. Within the Eurycanthinae two genera were recorded Dimorphodes and Neopromachus. In CAPC Dimorphodes is presented by D. prostastis, and Neopromachus by five species, N. wallacei and four other species, unidentified till now. However, two of these -according to Mr. Kneubuhler (pers. comm.)- are probably new species. The Necrosciinae subfamily is presented by two Sosibia species and the Phasmatinae subfamily only by Anchiale maculata. Also the Platycraninae are represented by a single species: Graeffea striaticollis.
Phasmida belong to the herbivor insects. Anchiale maculata and Sosibia eat the leaves of jambu biji; Psidium guajava and Graeffea striaticollis eat the leaves of sagu Metroxylon sagu. The habitat of Phasmida is primary and secondary forest, as many of their food plants are available there.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 4(4): April-June 2010

Content of this volume:

 

Francesco Vitali & Herlina Menufandu - A new species of Protilema Aurivillius, 1908 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Morimopsini) from Waigeu Island, New Guinea

Francesco Vitali - Taxonomic and synonymic notes about some Indonesian species of the genus Acalolepta Pascoe, 1858 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Lamiini)

Henk van Mastrigt, Iess Piran & Beatrix Wanma - Diversity and distribution of Papilionoidea (Lepidoptera) in the south eastern part of Papua, Indonesia

Stefan Schröder - A new species of Epimastidia Druce, 1891 from Papua, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae)

Flora Gratiana Adeodata - Keanekaragaman dan Penyebaran Spesies Kupu-kupu Famili Nymphalidae (Subfamili Charaxinae, Apaturinae, Nymphalinae dan Heliconiinae) di Papua

 

 

 

 

A new species of Protilema Aurivillius, 1908 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Morimopsini) from Waigeu Island, New Guinea - Francesco Vitali & Herlina Menufandu

 

 

Protilema papus spec. nov. (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is described from the Waigeu Island (Indonesia, West Papua). Observations regarding congener species and other genera of the tribe Morimopsini Lacordaire, 1869 from New Guinea are provided.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Taxonomic and synonymic notes about some Indonesian species of the genus Acalolepta Pascoe, 1858 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Lamiini) - Francesco Vitali

 

Four Indonesian Acalolepta-species (convexa Pascoe, 1866; solata Pascoe, 1866; bolanica Aurivillius, 1926 and solata nodias Kriesche, 1936) are investigated. Acalolepta bolanica (Aurivillius, 1926) is considered as a senior synonym of A. solata nodias (Kriesche, 1936) syn. nov. Acalolepta solata (Pascoe, 1866) comb. nov. is removed from the synonymy with Acalolepta convexa (Pascoe, 1866).

 

 

 

 

Diversity and distribution of Papilionoidea (Lepidoptera) in the south eastern part of Papua, Indonesia - Henk van Mastrigt, Iess Piran & Beatrix Wanma

In 2007 a survey was carried out in the savannah area near Merauke in south east Papua (see About Papua, Merauke). Two years later, WWF organized a survey in the nearby Mappi and Asmat area (see Newsletter November 2009). The results of both surveys are presented with a list of the 148 species recorded and some notes about significant taxa.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Orsotriaena medus at rest

 

A new species of Epimastidia Druce, 1891 from Papua, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) - Stefan Schröder

A new species of the genus Epimastidia closely related to E. inops is described from the Baliem Valley in Papua, Indonesia: Epimastidia yiwikana spec. nov.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

biotope of Epimastidia yiwika in Jiwika (Baliem Valley)

 

Keanekaragaman dan Penyebaran Spesies Kupu-kupu Famili Nymphalidae (Subfamili Charaxinae, Apaturinae, Nymphalinae dan Heliconiinae) di Papua - Flora Gratiana Adeodata

[The biodiversity and the distribution of Nymphalid butterflies (subfamilies Charaxinae, Apaturinae, Nymphalinae and Heliconiinae) in Papua]

 

 

 

The rapid clearance of rain forest by logging companies and conversion of land for various uses such as agriculture, industry and human settlements has had a significant impact on the ecological balance, and is now threatening the existence of endemic species and the diversity of butterflies in parts of Papua. Further research on endemic butterfly species in the twelve different eco-regions of Papua is urgently needed to provide accurate data for conservation development planning used by local governmental and nongovernmental organisations working on eco-region conservation.

The main goal of this research is to establish the diversity and population distribution of Nymphalid butterflies, especially the subfamilies of Charaxinae, Apaturinae, Nymphalinae, and Heliconiinae in Papua. The research used a descriptive analytic method, with studies of literature. Secondary data such as research results, specimens in collections (especially Koleksi Serangga Papua - Papuan Insect collection in Jayapura) and other references were studied.

The study led to the recognition of 53 species of Nymphalid butterflies occurring in Papua (the western part of New Guinea) consisting of 3 species of the Charaxinae subfamily, 5 species of the Apaturinae subfamily, 32 species of the Nymphalinae subfamily and 13 species of the Heliconiinae subfamily. The results are presented in two tables, one on the Papua Barat Province (Birdshead Peninsula) and the other on the Papua Province.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 4(3): January-March 2010

Content of this volume:

 

Henk van Mastrigt & Euniche Ramandey - Butterflies of the Island Mioswar, Papua, Indonesia

Henk van Mastrigt - Mysore and other names of Islands in the Cenderawasih Bay, Papua, Indonesia

Rob de Vos - Two new species of Hyalaethea Butler from Indonesian New Guinea (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae, Syntominae)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Butterflies of the Island Mioswar, Papua, Indonesia - Henk van Mastrigt & Euniche Ramandey

 

An annotated inventory is presented of the Papilionoidea of Mioswar, based on a survey in August 2009.

In August 2009 Euniche Ramandey, John Kaize and Henk van Mastrigt visited the island Mioswar in the Teluk Cenderawasih (former Geelvink Bay), between Manokwari and the Wondama Peninsula (former Wandammen), in order to make an actual inventory of its butterfly fauna and also to pay special attention to Odonata. Besides these two groups Coleoptera and Phasmida were collected.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mysore and other names of Islands in the Cenderawasih Bay, Papua, Indonesia - Henk van Mastrigt

 

 

 

 

 

Mysore is the former name for the islands of Supiori and Biak together, but is often incorrectly applied to the island of Mioswar. This publication considers the historical use of the names and identifies a number of taxa ambiguous origin. In addition, alternative names of other islands in the Cenderawasih Bay are presented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Two new species of Hyalaethea Butler from Indonesian New Guinea (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae, Syntominae) - Rob de Vos

 

 

 

Two new remarkable and conspicuous syntomine species have been discovered in the western part of New Guinea. They appear to belong to Hyalaethea Butler, 1887. Both species (H. attemae and H. obraztsovi) are described and depicted here. Besides that, a checklist is given of the Syntominae of Indonesian New Guinea as presently known, with pictures of the various species.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 4(2): October-December 2009

Content of this volume:

 

Rob de Vos & Jari Hyvärinen - A new Damias species from Biak Island (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae, Lithosiinae)

Henk van Mastrigt & Cees Gielis - Some important notes on Alucitidae (Lepidoptera) of Papua, Indonesia, with description of a new species

John Kaize & Vincent Kalkman - Records of dragonflies from kabupaten Merauke, Papua, Indonesia collected in 2007 and 2008 (Odonata)

Jaap Zwier - Asota eusemioides Felder, 1874, a new identity for an old moth “versicolor”, from New Guinea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Aganainae)

Henk van Mastrigt - Danaus affinis in Papua, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Danainae, Nymphalidae)

Henk van Mastrigt - First pictures of genitalia of Delias (Hubner, 1819) sp. from the Foja Mountains, Papua, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

 

 

 

 

A new Damias species from Biak Island (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae, Lithosiinae) - Rob de Vos & Jari Hyvärinen

 

 

 

A new species, Damias biakensis spec. nov., is found on the Island of Biak (Papua, Indonesia). The species is described and compared with related species from New Guinea. Adults and female genitalia of the treated species are depicted.

 

 

 

 

 

Some important notes on Alucitidae (Lepidoptera) of Papua, Indonesia, with description of a new species - Henk van Mastrigt & Cees Gielis

 

 

 

Recently Dr. Cees Gielis published an article of Alucitidae of New Guinea, with a checklist of the species, including seventeen new described species from Papua, Indonesia. Some errors in above mentioned article are corrected here, a new species is described and the checklist and pictures of species are presented here once again.

 

 

 

 

 

Records of dragonflies from kabupaten Merauke, Papua, Indonesia collected in 2007 and 2008 (Odonata) - John Kaize & Vincent Kalkman

 

 

Odonata were collected in the period 9 July to 4 August 2007 and 4 to 16 June 2008 in the surroundings of Merauke, Papua Province, Indonesia. In total 37 species were recorded during the fieldwork bringing the number of species known for the area to 42. It is estimated, that this is about half of the species present in the area. Of the 42 species recorded from the Merauke area 38 belong to the families of Coenagrionidae and Libellulidae. None of the genera endemic to New Guinea were recorded during the fieldwork and only one (Hemicordulia silvarum Ris, 1913) of the recorded species is endemic to New Guinea. The results seem to suggest that - compared to the central mountain range or the area in the north of New Guinea - the southern parts of New Guinea have an impoverished fauna. Further fieldwork in the area should be held in different seasons and should try to sample along running waters.

 

 

 

 

Asota eusemioides Felder, 1874, a new identity for an old moth “versicolor”, from New Guinea (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, Aganainae) - Jaap Zwier

 

 

 

In 1794 Fabricius gave the name Noctua versicolor to a moth living in "Americae Insulis" (= the islands of America), but subsequently the name has been applied erroneously to a moth in the genus Asota (Hübner) living in New Guinea and the surrounding islands. Donovan (1805) was probably the originator of the incorrect usage of this name in using his text, as well as in the legend to a picture in his book about the butterflies and moths of Australia and New Guinea. Subsequently almost all authors have followed Donovan's error, though it was recognised as an error by Jordan (1897). The name versicolor should therefore not be applied to this New Guinea moth, but replaced by Asota eusemioides Felder, 1874 [being the next available name].

 

 

 

 

Danaus affinis in Papua, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Danainae, Nymphalidae) - Henk van Mastrigt

 

 

The distribution of Danaus affinis ssp. in Papua, Indonesia, is presented. A new subspecies is described from the lower mountains outside Baliem Valley. Also a map and illustrations of various subspecies and forms are presented.

 

 

 

 

 

 

First pictures of genitalia of Delias (Hubner, 1819) sp. from the Foja Mountains, Papua, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) - Henk van Mastrigt

 

 

 

In 2005 and 2008 two expeditions to the Foja Mountains, organized by Conservation International in cooperation with LIPI, Cibinong, resulted in not less than seven new species of Delias (Hübner, 1819). In the description of these new species (Van Mastrigt, 2006; 2009) only morphological characters were given. No attention was paid on the genitalia, because of lack of experience in dissecting genitalia among the young scientists in Papua and because of the difficult procedures to send species legally abroad. Three species of the genus Delias from the Foja Mountains are illustrated with the male genitalia: Delias cumanau, D. durai and D. ormoensis.

 

 

 

 

 


 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 4(1): July-September 2009

Content of this volume:

 

Rob de Vos - The species of the genus Monosyntaxis Swinhoe from New Guinea, with description of a new species and the transfer of another to a new genus (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae, Lithosiinae)

Vincent J. Kalkman, Henk van Mastrigt & Stephen J. Richards - First records of dragonflies (Odonata) from the Foja Mountains, Papua Province, Indonesia

Students’ corner:

Yohanes L. A. Kaize - Comparison Study on the diversity of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata) inside and outside the National Reserve Wasur, Kabupaten Merauke (in Bahasa Indonesia)

Klemens S. Naraha - Comparison Study on the diversity of butterflies of the Superfamily Papilionoidea in the region East Biak and West Biak, Kabupaten Biak Numfor (in Bahasa Indonesia)

 

 

 

The species of the genus Monosyntaxis Swinhoe from New Guinea, with description of a new species and the transfer of another to a new genus (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae, Lithosiinae) - Rob de Vos

 

 

The species of the genus Monosyntaxis Swinhoe, 1901 occurring in New Guinea are reviewed. Of the nine recognized Monosyntaxis species in Indo-Australia only three are known from New Guinea. One of these is a new species which is recently discovered, Monosyntaxis bimaculata spec. nov. from the Foja Mountains, and is described. Chrysaeglia samoana Gaede, 1925 syn. nov. is synonymized with Chrysaeglia samoensis Rebel, 1915, which morphologically belongs to Monosyntaxis. Oeonistis metallescens Rothschild, 1912, which was previously supposed to belong to Monosyntaxis turned out to belong to another new genus and is transferred to Papuasyntaxis gen. nov. The adults and the genitalia of all New Guinea species are depicted.

 

 

 

 

 

First records of dragonflies (Odonata) from the Foja Mountains, Papua Province, Indonesia - Vincent J. Kalkman, Henk van Mastrigt & Stephen J. Richards

 

A small collection of dragonflies obtained during two RAP biodiversity surveys to the Foja Mountains, organised by Conservation International with help of LIPI, Bogor, in 2005 and 2008 are brought on record. Twelve species were found at two sites below 100 m near Kwerba, a small village adjacent to the Mamberamo River. Thirteen species were recorded at 'Moss Camp' at 1650 m in the Foja Mountains. Of these Hemicordulia ericetorum was previously only known from the central mountain range while Oreaeschna dictatrix was only known from Lake Paniai and the Cyclops Mountains. It is likely that more genera and species now known only from the central mountain range occur in the Foja Mountains and probably also the Van Rees Mountains. However one species, Argiolestes spec. nov. is probably endemic to the Foja Mountains. Although this collection includes only a small fraction of the diversity likely to be present in the mountains it is nonetheless of interest as it represents the first records of dragonflies from the area.

 

 

 

 

Comparison Study on the diversity of dragonflies and damselflies (Odonata) inside and outside the National Reserve Wasur, Kabupaten Merauke (in Bahasa Indonesia) - Yohanes L. A. Kaize

 

 

From July 9th till August 8th 2007, a survey was held in the Merauke area, in order to compare the diversity and populations of Odonata inside and outside the National Reserve Wasur. In total 339 specimens were recorded, representing 37 species in three families. 225 specimens were recorded inside the reserve TNW, representing 36 species: 26 of the family Libellulidae, 9 of the family Coenagrionidae and 1 of the family Corduliidae. Outside the reserve 114 specimens were collected, representing 20 species of the family Libellulidae and 8 species of the family Coenagrionidae. No endemic species were found. To get more complete data on Odonata in this area, surveys at other localities and in other times of the year are requested.

 

 

 

 

Comparison Study on the diversity of butterflies of the Superfamily Papilionoidea in the region East Biak and West Biak, Kabupaten Biak Numfor (in Bahasa Indonesia) - Klemens S. Naraha

 

 

From July 19th to August 2nd 2005 a survey was conducted in East and West Biak, using Count transect method, in order to know the diversity and the distribution of butterflies and to get information about endemic species. As many as 113 species were recorded, 81 in East Biak and 90 species in West Biak. Seven endemic species were found, from which two have a slightly wider distribution than Biak and Supiori only: one is also present on Numfor; the other on Japen. It is advised that the Government pays attention on conservation, especially when planning new development areas. Also it is of great importance that study of biodiversity will become a subject in formal education.

 

 

 

 


 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 3(4): April-June 2009

Content of this volume:

 

D. Peggie, R.I. Vane-Wright & H. v. Mastrigt - A new member of the Ideopsis gaura superspecies (Lepidoptera: Danainae) from the Foja Mountains, Papua, Indonesia

Gerrit Withaar - Addenda & Corrigenda [on The distribution of the genus Tmesisternus Latreille, 1829 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Tmesisternini), with the description of six new species from the Indonesian islands Flores and Sulawesi]

Student's corner:

Angginta Renta Simanjuntak - Inventory of Dragonflies and Damsleflies species (Odonata) in the Reserve Area of the Wondiboi Mountains, District Rasiei, Kabupaten Teluk Wondama [Wandammen]

Diah Rikamawanti - Inventory of beetle species (Coleoptera) in the Reserve Area of the Wondiboi Mountains, District Rasiei, Kabupaten Teluk Wondama [Wandammen]

Aini Shintawati - Diversity of butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea) at the Tandia village, District Rasiei, Kabupaten Teluk Wondama [Wandammen]

 

 

A new member of the Ideopsis gaura superspecies (Lepidoptera: Danainae) from the Foja Mountains, Papua, Indonesia - D. Peggie, R.I. Vane-Wright & H. v. Mastrigt

 

 

A new member of the Ideopsis gaura superspecies, Ideopsis (Ideopsis) fojana sp.nov., from the Foja Mountains, Papua, Indonesia, is described. This new species is the most easterly representative of the superspecies yet discovered. Reasons for according this taxon status as a semispecies (rather than subspecies) within this taxonomically challenging group are discussed.

 

 

 

 

 

Addenda & Corrigenda: The distribution of the genus Tmesisternus Latreille, 1829 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Tmesisternini), with the description of six new species from the Indonesian islands Flores and Sulawesi - Gerrit Withaar

This publication was printed in SUGAPA 3(3): 14-27. However, unfortunately some important printing errors were made which may cause some confusion or misinterpretation. Therefore it is necessary to present addenda and corrigenda as given in this issue. The colour plate with figures 1-6 is replaced with a new one.

 

Student's corner

Inventory of Dragonflies and Damselflies species (Odonata) in the Reserve Area of the Wondiboi Mountains, District Rasiei, Kabupaten Teluk Wondama [Wandammen] - Angginta Renta Simanjuntak

 

From 12 to 26 August, 2008 a survey was held in the Wondiboi Reserve in the surroundings of the village Tandia in three different habitats, secondary forest (with pool and river), residential area including crop fields, primary forest with river. Fourteen species of Odonata were collected, respresenting two families within the Suborder Anisoptera and three families within the Suborder Zygoptera. In the secondary forest (with pool) 5 species were found, in the residential area 14 specoes and in the primary forest only one species.

Attention is needed to protect and develop the Wondiboi Reserve, rich on biodiversity. More surveys are needed to complete these data, especially on other localities in this reserve.

 

 

 

 

Inventory of beetle species (Coleoptera) in the Reserve Area of the Wondiboi Mountains, District Rasiei, Kabupaten Teluk Wondama [Wandammen] - Diah Rikamawanti

 

From 12 to 26 August, 2008 a survey was held in the Wondiboi Reserve in the surroundings of the villages Tandia, Uryemi and Sasirey, in five different habitats, primary forest, secondary forest, residential area, gardens and along River Siai. Fifty species of Coleoptera were collected, representing seventeen families. Eight species were identified up to family level, 22 up to generic level and 20 up to species level. In the primary forest 8 species were found, in the secondary forest 10 species, in the residential area 19 species, in the crop fields 8 species and along River Siai 11 species. The family Curculionidae was the most well represented family. Other surveys are needed, especially in the other months and seasons, and on other spots to get an entire view of the diversity of Coleoptera in this area.

Eupholus vlasimskii in the Rasiei District, Wandammen (photo: Rinto Mambrasar, 2008), recently described by Balke & Riedel in 2002 from the same area.

 

 

 

Diversity of butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea) at the Tandia village, District Rasiei, Kabupaten Teluk Wondama [Wandammen] - Aini Shintawati

From 12 to 26 August, 2008 a survey was held in the Wondiboi Reserve in the surroundings of the village Tandia in five different habitats, river sides, secondary forest, primary forest and residential area, including crop fields. Ninety five species of butterflies of the Superfamily Papilionoidea were collected, representing the four families in this area. Results on diversity between the various habitats are low (Index Shannon Wiener between 1.5 and 3.5). The index Similarity (Sorensen) varies from 88.89 (between primary and secondary forest) to 11.11 (between primary forest and river side).

More surveys are needed to get a more complete view on the butterflies in the Wondiboi Reserve, especially in other seasons and for a longer time.

 

 


 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 3(3): January-March 2009

Content of this volume:

 

Henk van Mastrigt - Some notes on Delias (Hübner, 1819) from the Foja Mountains, Papua, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

Gerrit Withaar - The distribution of the genus Tmesisternus Latreille, 1829 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Tmesisternini), with the description of six new species from the Indonesian islands Flores and Sulawesi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some notes on Delias (Hübner, 1819) from the Foja Mountains, Papua, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) - Henk van Mastrigt

 

The second survey to the Foja Mts (at 1,650 m) increased the number of Delias species recorded in that area from eight to twelve, including a new species (Delias papuana) described in this issue (see picture on the left). On 1,250 m three species were collected, including one not recorded at 1,650 m. Further information about the Foja Delias, including descriptions of the female of D. durai and the male of D. microsticha weja is provided.

 

 

 

 

The distribution of the genus Tmesisternus Latreille, 1829 (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae, Tmesisternini), with the description of six new species from the Indonesian islands Flores and Sulawesi - Gerrit Withaar

 

 

 

The genus Tmesisternus with its 257 described species is known from Kangea till Solomon Islands and N. Australia. 242 species occur in New Guinea, including 175 endemic species. Recent surveys and studies in musea have lead to the recognition of six new species, four from Sulawesi and two from Flores, which are described here. Besides that a key is given for the specimens of Sulawesi.

 

 

Tmesisternus weigeli Withaar, 2009, one of the six new species

 

 

 

 


 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 3(2): October-December 2008

Content of this volume:

 

Henk van Mastrigt - Introduced species of Lepidoptera in Papua

Chris Davenport & Henk van Mastrigt - Revision of Delias mysis (Fabricius, 1775) and closely related species (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Introduced species of Lepidoptera in Papua - Henk van Mastrigt

 

 

Four species of hitherto alien lepidoptera are recorded in Papua (the Indonesian part of New Guinea): Papilio demoleus, Euthalia aconthea, Elymnias hypermnestra, Junonia altiles. The temporary presence of Samia ricini in Irian Jaya is recorded.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Revision of Delias mysis (Fabricius, 1775) and closely related species (Lepidoptera: Pieridae) - Chris Davenport & Henk van Mastrigt

Because of sympatry of Delias lara and D. mysis nemea at Sota, in the Merauke area of Papua, a division of Delias mysis in two species is proposed: D. mysis with four subspecies and D. lara stat. nov. with five subspecies, including four comb. nov. Four subspecies are regarded synonyms (syn. nov.). The closely related species D. euphemia from the islands of Supiori and Biak and D. doylei from the Central Mountain Range in PNG are compared and illustrated.

 

 


 

SUGAPA (Suara Serangga Papua), Volume 3(1): July-September 2008

Content of this volume:

 

Rob de Vos - Scoliacma suzannae and S. adriani, two new species from Papua, Indonesia, and S. flava synonymized with S. heringi (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae, Lithosiinae)

Carlo Arrigo Casadio - Description of a new species of the genus Rosenbergia from New Guinea in the Natural History Museum, London (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)

Henk van Mastrigt - Some notes on the distribution of genus Mynes Boisduval, 1832 in the Provinces Papua and Papua Barat, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Nymphalinae)

Herlina Menufandu - Distribusi kumbang pemakan bangkai pada beberapa tempat di Papua

 

 

 

 

Scoliacma suzannae and S. adriani, two new species from Papua, Indonesia, and S. flava synonymized with S. heringi (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae, Lithosiinae) - Rob de Vos

 

 

Two new species of the genus Scoliacma Meyrick, 1886 are described from Papua, Indonesia: Scoliacma suzannae spec. nov. and S. adriani spec. nov. The recently new described species Scoliacma flava De Vos & Van Mastrigt, 2007 syn. nov. is synonymized with S. heringi Gaede, 1925. Of all new taxa male and female adults, genitalia and a distribution map are depicted. The lectotype (now designated from syntypes) of Scoliacma heringi and the holotype of S. flava syn. nov. are figured.

 

 

 

Description of a new species of the genus Rosenbergia from New Guinea in the Natural History Museum, London (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) - Carlo Arrigo Casadio

 

 

A new species of the genus Rosenbergia Ritsema, 1881, Rosenbergia darwini spec.nov., from New Guinea is described. A complete checklist of all Rosenbergia species from Papua is given, the new species and a distribution map is depicted.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some notes on the distribution of genus Mynes Boisduval, 1832 in the Provinces Papua and Papua Barat, Indonesia (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae, Nymphalinae) - Henk van Mastrigt

 

 

 

 

The distribution of Mynes sp. in Papua is updated with the first records of Mynes anemone from Papua Province, Indonesia, collected close to Kwerba, Mamberamo area and in the environment of Ambaidiru at the Island Japen. In addition the female of Mynes anemone is described and pictured.

 

 

 

The distribution of Scavenger beetles at some localities in Papua (Coleoptera: Hybosoridae) - Herlina Menufandu (text originally in Bahasa Indonesia)

 

 

Scavenger-beetles (Hybosoridae) were surveyed at various areas in the northern part of Papua, Indonesia from June 2007 to June 2008. The results show a dominancy of Phaeochrous emarginatus and Anaides spp. which have different distributions. Phaeochrous emarginatus is found in primary and secondary forest close to villages and towns and even in the close environment of settlements. Anaides spp. however occur in outlying districts, mostly in secondary forest. Using pitfall traps with fish and meat not only members of the Hybosoridae were found, but also members of Geotrupidae (dung-beetles), Trogidae (carcass-beetles), Silphidae (carrion-beetles), Staphylinidae (rove beetles) and Histeridae (clown-beetles). Most of them could not be identified yet.

 

 


 

English translations of the most interesting articles from the newsletter of Suara Serangga Papua (SUGAPA) are presented. This local magazine, entirely in Bahasa Indonesia, appeared about every three months. The translations were done by Henk van Mastrigt. The subjects are too interesting to ignore. Although the contents is mostly very brief, it will inform you about what the students and teachers of the University of Cenderawasih in Waena and the Entomological Workgroup in Papua (Kelompok Entomologi Papua, KEP) are doing. More information can be requested at entopapua@yahoo.com.au.

Newsletter Suara Serangga Papua:

Select a volume: Edition I: July-September 2006, Edition II: October-December 2006, Edition III: January-March 2007, Edition IV: April-June 2007, Edition V: July-September 2007, Edition VI: October-December 2007, Edition VII: January-March 2008, Edition VIII: April-June 2008.

The volumes below are presented in reversed chronological sequence

 

 

 

 

 

Edition VIII: April-June 2008

Comparison of diversity of butterflies (Superfamily Papilionoidea) inside and outside National Reserve Wasur, Merauke
By Beatrix Wanma

 

For this survey, held in the period 8th July till 9th August 2007, three localities were chosen inside the National Reserve (Sota, Rawa Biru and Ndalir) and three localities outside the reserve (Solar, Erom, Buti Payum), representing secondary forest, grassland and coastal area.
101 species of butterflies were collected: 9 Papilionidae, 8 Pieridae, 4 Lycaenidae and 40 Nymphalidae. 84 species were found outside the reserve; 75 species inside the reserve. Erom (H’=0.839) and Rawa Biru (H’=0.837) had the highest diversity; Sota (H’=0.661) and Buti Payun (H’=0.491). As special records may be mentioned Delias argenthona balli (endemic in Merauke area), D. mysis nemea, Hypochrysops apollo (only known from a single specimen from Papua and a few from PNG), Freyera trochylus, Mycalesis sirius (five new specimens for KSP), Neopithecops lucifer, and Elymnias agondas with beautiful varieties in the females.

 

 


 

Surveying Papilionoidea at the Archipelago Moor and Mambor, Nabire
By Hanna Kawulur

 

From 7th July till 6th August 2003 a survey was held by Hanna Kawulur, Henk van Mastrigt, Edy Rosariyanto and six students from the Cenderwasih University (UNCEN), at three islands at the archipelago of Moor and six islands at the archipelago of Mambor.
At the three islands of the archipelago of Moor 90 species were recorded: at Moor 68, at Ratewi 74 and at the small island of Nuta Uti 29. At the six islands of the archipelago of Mambor 75 species were recorded, including 20 species which were not recorded at the archipelago of Moor: at Mambor 43, at Here 24, at Mowirin 43, at Hariti 62, and at the very small islands of Ahee and Warahire respectively 8 and 2 species.
Some special notes concern Papilio albinus and Graphium codrus (only at Moor), Cepora aspasia (at four islands), Bindahara phocides in large numbers at the coast of Moor and Mambor, Hypochrysops apelles was common at Moor, Mowirin and Hariti, Idea durvillei (common at Hariti), Parthenos tigrina (only at Warahire) and P. aspila (at nearly all other islands), Euploea phaenareta (with very many individuals at Nusa Uti – males only).


 

 

 

 

Three days surveying at Mios Num
By Rinto Hery Mambrasar

The island of Num is a small island west of Japen, where we spend three days (16-18 June 2007) for collecting. The local people are dependent from sea and forest for daily needs. In talk with local people we point out how important it is the keep sea and forest in good condition so that the use will be sustainable. Only thirty species of Superfamily Papilionoidea were collected, without any rarities: 8 Papilionidae, 1 Pieridae, 10 Lycaenidae and 11 Nymphalidae.
The Arctiidae moth Utetheisa disrupta was present in large numbers inside the village.
The poor results on this island support the theory between the number of species and size of an island.


Potency of consuming insects in Papua
By Ika Ramandey

 

From 19 to 21 February 2008 an international Workshop was held in Chiang Mai (Thailand) on edible insects, organized by FAO.
At the meeting – with participants from eight S.E. Asian countries and four other countries – we want to share the possibilities of insects becoming a source of protein for local people in Papua. Papuans of about 260 tribes are familiar with the consumption of 80-100 species of insects, although the areas are quite restricted.
In countries as Thailand and China consumption of insects is much wider distributed than in Papua: on markets dried and tinned insects of various kinds are for sale, mostly breed by local people.
Some tribes in Papua have a good knowledge of insects, as the very detailed knowledge on Cosmopsaltria (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha) at the Mee people in the Kobowre Mountains.
In all lowlands we find consumption of the sago grub. Besides that Blattidea, Phasmida, Orthoptera, Mantodea, Hymenoptera, Hemiptera, Coleoptera, Ephemenoptera and Lepidoptera (over 50 moths and/or caterpillars) belong to the diet of one or more tribes.

 

 


Survey on butterflies of Superfamily Papilionoidea at three different habitats at Haya, Mamberamo area, Papua
By Rawati Panjaitan

A survey was organized by Conservation International and the State University Papua at Manokwari around the Haya village (02º48.951’S and 138º05.903’E) from 9 to 26 February 2008, were various taxonomical groups were surveyed, including reptiles and amphibians, mammals, fresh water fish, birds, insects and plants. Butterflies were collected in seasonally inundated swamps, in plains and at hill sites up to 180 m above sea level. 130 species were collected: 80 in the seasonally inundated areas, 97 in the plains and 80 at the lower hills, including 14 members of the family Papilionidae, 17 Pieridae, 42 Lycaenidae and 57 Nymphalidae.
Worthwhile to mention are five different species of Arhopala (herculina, madytus, azenia, admete and thamyras) and 13 members of the subfamily Satyrinae, including Lamprolenis nitida (in Papua only known from Eilanden River in the south and Marina Valen (also in Mamberamo area).

 


Edition VII: January-March 2008

Curculionoidea (Coleoptera)
By Henk van Mastrigt

ALEXANDER RIEDEL visited Jayapura in December 2007. For many years he has been working on Curculionidae (about 100,000 species worldwide – only 50,000 described), especially the genus Trigonopterus (Cryptorhynchinae). He held an interesting presentation at the Cenderawasih University, for about 25 students and teachers of the biological department.
From Papua Indonesia alone about 1,000 species are described, but that number may be increase to 10,000 by good surveying. The genus Trigonopterus, very small sized (1-5 mm) and not flying beetles (see picture) is hyperdiverse in Papua. Although there are only 45 described species in New Guinea, several hundred mostly undescribed species are known. In the Cyclops Mts alone there are about 45 species. Nothing is known about their evolution and ecology. ALEXANDER , who is Curator Entomology of the State Museum of Natural History Karlsruhe, Germany, explained the way in which these beetles must be collected and hopes to get support from the teachers and students. This website will get support from ALEXANDER in the near future.

 

 

 

 

 

Diversity and distribution of Dragon- and Damselflies (Odonata) at River Biru (“Borhoniweici”) Kotaraja, Kabupaten Jayapura
By Bernardus Jamo

A survey was held at River Biru, Kotaraja, Jayapura, from December 2001 to May 2002 and 149 specimens of Odonata were collected, representing 6 families, 14 genera and 21 species. The most abundant species was Rhinochypha tincta (29 %) and the rarest were Agriocnemis sp., Huonia dapne, Tetrathemis sp., Neurothemis luctuosa and Bracydiplax sp.(0.57%).
The complete list of identified species is as follows:
Anisoptera: Neurothemis stigmatizans, N. luctuosa, Crocothemis erythrae, Tetrathemis sp., Orthetrum sabina, Huonia thais, H. dapne, H. arborophila, Nannophelebia alexia, Bracydiplax sp. (Libellulidae), Paragomphus sp. (Gomphidae).
Zygoptera: Agriocnemis sp., Onychargia specs. (Coenagrionidae), Notoneura sp. (Protoneuridae), Rhinocypha tincta (Chlorocyphidae), Neurobasis australis (Calopterygidae). Some specimens could not be identified to species level by us.


 

 

 

 

 

Comparison diversity of Nymphalid butterflies at South and North side of Mt Bonsupiori, Supiori Island, Kabupaten Supiori (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae)
By Dra. Daawia & Evie L. Warikar

Data about the diversity of butterflies at Mt Bonsupiori are still poor. Warikar et al. (2005) reported 110 specimens from the south side (11 Papilionidae, 7 Pieridae, 39 Lycaenidae and 53 Nympalidae), based on surveying within only 5 km2, reporting some endemics as Dicallaneura princessa, Deudorix maudei (Lycaenidae) and Ideopsis hewitsonii, Euploea tripunctata, Euploea albicosta, Taenaris scylla, Cirrochroa imperatrix and a - probably new to science – Mycalesis sp. (Nymphalidae).
New political developments made Supiori a separate Kabupaten (Sub Province), which probably will cause a real threat on protection of flora and fauna and its reserve.
The survey – held from 24 to 31 August 2007 with direct observation method – resulted in 46 species Nymphalidae, including five endemics (Tellervo parvipuncta, Ideopsis hewitsonii, Euploea albicosta, Taenaris scilla and Cirrochroa imperatrix), and seven species not recorded at the south side in 2004 (Tellervo parvipuncta, Ideopsis juventa, Euploea algea, Taenaris catops, T. cyclops, Prothoe australis and Hypolimnas alimena), lifting the total number of Nymphalidae to 60 species, which is about 27% of the Papuan population.


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comparing study between diversity of butterflies (Superfamily Papilionoidea) at Supiori Island, Biak Island and Padaido Archipelago
By Dra. Daawia & Evie L. Warikar

This study will show the relationship between the number of species found at the various islands and the vastness of the islands Biak (the largerst one) and Supiori and the very small islands Meos, Kubori and Rasi in the Padaido Archipelago.
During the survey in 22 effective days between 19 July and 17 August 2007 the samples were made according to the Transek Count at Line Transect method (Sutherland, 1996). Indicators used were “species richness” and “indeks Shannon Wienner" (H’).
At Biak 112 Papilionoidea species were recorded, at Supiori 66 species and at the Padaido islands only 27 species, which leads to a species richness index H’= 1.631 at Biak, H’= 1.576 at Supiori and H’=1.086 for the Padaido islands.
At this survey six endemics were recorded: Pareronia chinki, Delias talboti (Pieridae), Ideopsis hewitsonii, Euploea albicosta, Taenaris scylla, Cirrochroa imperatrix (Nymphalidae), which are endemics at Biak and Delias dohertyi (Pieridae) which is endemic in the Biak-Japen area.

 

 

 

Insects on stamps
By Henk van Mastrigt

One of the new Delias species collected at the Foja Mountains was named Delias kristianiae after MRS. KRISTIANI HERAWATI, Indonesia’s first lady, to honour and to support the Indonesian President, MR. SUSILO BAMBANG YUDHOYONO, in his efforts to save the Indonesian forest and to protect it against illegal logging, especially in Papua.
Every year at 5 November (National Day on Flora and Fauna) PT Pos Indonesia has been paying special attention to the environment with a series of stamps. Last year the results of the Foja expedition got special attention in this series, with two birds (Milopotes carolae and Amblyornis flavifrons) and two plants (Licuala arbuscula and Livistona mamberamoensis); this year four butterflies were chosen (Delias kristianiae, Ornithoptera aesacus, O. croesus and Troides hypolytus).
Since 2001 no insects were pictured on stamps anymore. In that year five beetles were depicted (Batocera rosenbergi, Chalcosoma caucasus, Chrysochroa buqueti, Agestrata dehaani and Mormolyca phyliodes).
Stamps do not only have a monetary function but also an educational one: by this series people can learn more about Indonesian entomological biodiversity.

 

 

 

 


Edition VI: October-December 2007

Editorial
Some important facts of the last few months:
Surveys to Japen (Nuburay), Miosnum, Biak and Padaido (organized by KEP together with students of UNCEN) and to Biak, Supiori and Papdaido (organized by UNCEN). Results will be published later.
Ferra Manobi finished her studies with a paper on Odonata at Ambaidiru (Japen) and two young pupils of secondary schools in Jayapura (Vina Vania Suhartawan and Viva Virginia Suhartawan) won a national scientific contest with a study on mimicry on Lepidoptera at the Cyclops Mountains National Reserve near Jayapura. See below.
Finally at September 10th 2007 a new book was presented in The ecology of Indonesia Series: Volume VI: The Ecology of Papua (see New Books), in which two contributions especially on insects: 4.3. Insects of Papua (by Scott E. Miller) and 4.4 Cicada Endemism in Papua (by Hans Duffels & Arnold J. de Boer).


Diversity and distribution of Dragonflies and Damselflies (Odonata) at the Manatiungna and Ambokari Rivers at Ambaidiru District Kosiwo, Kabupaten Yapen.
By Ferra Ice Julanda Manobi

 

 

 

 

During the survey to Ambaidiru (Japen) in July 2006, three members were focussed on Odonata: Vincent Kalkman (Naturalis, Leiden) together with Ferra Manobi and John Kaize (two students of UNCEN). The results of 13 days collecting between 400 and 1200 meter are reported in the final papers of Ferra Manobi.

 

 

 

In total 50 species of Odonata were recorded: 24 species of the Suborder Zygoptera, representing 8 families, and 26 species of the Suborder Anisoptera, representing 4 families, as follows:

Calopterygidae 1
Libellulidae 20
Chlorocyphidae 1
Macromiidae 3
Coenagrionidae 8
Corduliidae 1
Platycnemididae 3
Synthemistidae 1
Platysticdae 1
 
Protoneuridae 2
 
Megapodagrionidae 4
 
Ashnidae 4
 

The importance of this survey is underlined in the conclusions, with among others the following statements:
· Previously only thirteen species of Odonata were known from Japen; this survey did increase this number with thirty seven, to fifty species.
· Seven of the fifty species are probably new to science and are objects for further studies.
· More surveys on Japen will surely lead to more new discoveries.
Full information (in Indonesian language) is available in:
Manobi, Ferra Ice Julanda. 2007. Keragaman dan Penyebaran Capung (Odonata) pada Sungai Manatiungna dan Ambokari Distrik Kosiwo, Kabupaten Yapen. (Universitas Cenderawasih, Jayapura – not published)


Study on the phenomenon mimicry on Butterflies (Lepidoptera) at the Cyclops Mountains Reserve

By Vina Vania Suhartawan & Viva Virginia Suhartawan

A high diversity of butterflies and moths is found in Cyclops Mountains Reserve. Less study is done on mimicry. Observation in nature is a good method in education for mimicry, a phenomenon that is common at insects especially at butterflies and moths, when a species (mimic) has profit from its superficial imitation of another species (model). The reason is often an aposematic one: by colour and/or design, which causes that predators (vertebrates) recognize the species as distasteful, inedible or dangerous.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parsons (1999) mentioned two theories: Mullerian mimicry (similarity between a number of species which are distasteful, inedible or dangerous and therefore avoided by predators) and Batesian mimicry (a single species which is palatable imitates an unpalatable or dangerous species).

 

 

 

Both Mullerian mimicry and Batesian mimicry are present at the Cyclops Mountains. Papilio laglaizei (Papilionidae) with Alcides agathyrsus (Uraniidae), genus Neptis (Nymphalinae, Nymphalidae) with genus Tellervo (Ithomiinae, Nymphalidae), and Papilio ambrax (female) (Papilionini, Papilionidae) with Athophaneura polydorus (Troidini, Papilionidae) are examples of Batesian mimicry. Examples of Mullerian mimicry in early stages are much more difficult to find. Good examples are the larvae and pupae of Troides oblongmaculatus and Ornithoptera priamus and the genus Hyanthis with Taenaris (both Morphinae, Nymphalidae).

Alcides spec. (Uraniidae) at Dotir (Wandammen Peninsula)

 

 

 

Diversity of butterflies (Superfamily Papilionoidea) at the Waropen Atas Region (Japen Island), Papua
By Evie L. Warikar

 

From 27 April to 17 May 2007 a survey was held at the Waropen Atas Region (Japen) in Papua, at six different locations: Gesa, Noau, Baitanisa, Nuriba, Wakamba and Pitohui. 94 different species of Papilionoidea were recorded: 12 Papilionidae, 6 Pieridae, 31 Lycaenidae and 45 Nymphalidae. The results at the various localities were quite different, not only because of different habitats, but also caused by different number of search days. At Baitanisa 68 species were recorded in 6 days, at Noau 63 species in 5 days, at Nuriba 38 species in 1 day, at Gesa 29 species in 3 days, at Pitohui 11 species in 2 days, at Wakamba 5 species in 2 days. Some common species in the Mamberamo area and in the surrounding of Jayapura were not found on this survey. Danaus affinis was only recorded at Wakamba.
The result of 93 species still shows a high diversity in Waropen Atas area. However, disturbed or even destroyed forest and the absence of many species, common in other parts of Waropen, are a signal that conservation is urged to save the diversity in this region.

 

 

 

 


Edition V: July-September 2007

Food sources of Nymphalid butterflies in the forest at Campus Universitas Cenderawasih, Waena
By Evie L. Warikar, Nelly Lunga and Ervina Indrayani

 

Background
The forest around the Campus UNCEN is a study object for students, rich with flora and fauna and a good place for inventory of food plants for butterflies.
Food plants of 11 species of Papilionidae were published (Banuaty, 2005), with six food plants for caterpillars and ten species for nectar sucking butterflies.
Many activities of local people caused serious forest damage, which may cause a decline of the number of food plants, influencing on its turn the number of butterfly species and its populations.

Result
During 15 days in the period 13 May to 24 June 2006 the survey was held, resulting in twelve species plants and three kinds of minerals, found along rivers, in grass land and secondary forest. Food for butterflies was the nectar of the flowers, rotten fruits and bracts. Twenty six species of Nymphalids were feeding on the above mentioned food sources. Bidens pilosa was often used for consumption; of less interest were Ficus sp. Macaranga tesselata, Freycinetia sp., and Parastemon urophylus were food plants for Lexias and Taenaris. We observed Lexias (subfamily Nymphalinae) and Taenaris (subfamily Morphinae) consuming dropped bracts of Freycinetia sp. (family Pandanaceae). Concluding, food plants for Nymphalid butterflies were found in all three habitats, which effected the presence of Nymphalids at the Campus of the University. At river sides, of course, many minerals are available, which are very poor in grass land and secondary forest.

 

 

Distribution of Papilionoidea in lowlands and low hills in West Papua
by Henk van Mastrigt

Since 2001 many surveys have been held by K.E.P. and teachers and students of the Cenderwasih University: Fak-Fak (FF, 2005), Numfor Island (NU, 2005), Moor and Mambor Islands (MM, 2003), Supiori (SU, 2004), Yapen (YA, 2006,2007), Mamberamo district (MB, 2001,2004,2005), Kumamba Islands (KK, 2002), Pantai Timur Islands (PT, 2001) and Ubrub (UB, 2003).

Based on Parsons (1999) 427 species butterflies are present in West Papua below 900 meters above sea level. In the various surveys we collected or observed 310 species, which means 72,60% of Parsons' total number.

Table 1 shows the distribution per family and subfamily, concerning the various surveys.
The number of Lycaenids (64,71%) is below the average; the number of Nymphalids (83,22%) is the highest one.
In the Mamberamo area we collected and observed 70% of the 310 species we found or 50,82% of the total number of species in the lowlands (however, we made three surveys in that area); on the second place is the Fak-Fak area (48,39%; 35,13%), where we only spend ten days; followed by Yapen (41,61%; 30,21%), Ubrub (36,45%; 26,46%) and so on till the Pantai Timur Isles (19,03%; 13,82%).

From the 310 species we observed only twelve species (3,87%) were found at all nine localities: Ornithoptera priamus, Papilio aegeus, Eurema puella, Hypolycaena phorbas, Jamides celeno, Danaus affinis, Euploea tulliolus, Taenaris artemis, Cyrestis acilia, Pantoporia venilia, Hypolimnas bolina and Vindula arsinoe; another twelve species were found on eight localities: Antrophaneura polydorus, Graphium agamemnon, Papilio ambrax, Eurema hecabe, Arhopala philander, Psychonotis caelius, Catopyrops ancyra, Jamides coritus, Everes lacturnus, Yoma algina, Cethosia cydippe and Cupha prosope. 25 species (8,06%) were found at seven localities; 19 species (6,13%) at six; 24 species (7,74%) at five, 23 species (7,42%) at four, 38 species (12,26%) at three, and 57 species (18,39%) at two localities One hundred species were only found at one locality.
From these one hundred 44 species were found in the Mamberamo area, 18 at Supiori, 13 at Fak-Fak, 7 at the Moor and Mambor Islands and also at Yapen, 4 at Ubrub, 3 at the Kumamba Islands and 2 at Numfor and at the Pantai Timur Islands.

Because of various reasons it is hard to compare the different areas. However, it can be stated that the biodiversity in the Mamberamo area and at Fak-Fak is high. Supiori Island has quite a few endemics. More surveying in Ubrub and Fak-Fak will increase the number of species in the areas. On the other localities no real increases are to be expected.

Abbreviations in the tabel below :
FF = Fak-Fak (2005)
NU = Numfor Island (2005)
MM = Moor Mambor Islands (2003)
SU = Supiori (2004)
YA = Yapen (2006)
MB = gabungan dari Kwerba (2005)
KK = Kumamba Islands (2002)
PT = Pantai Timur Islands (2001)
UB = Ubrub (Kec. Web) (2003)
TT = Total species
Exp. N. = Expected number in lowlands

Results of surveys in lowlands and low mountainous areas on Papua mainland and islands

FF NU MM SU YA MB KK PT UB TT Exp. N % of Exp. N.
Papilioninae 15 9 13 11 12 18 3 5 12 19 25 76.00
Papilionidae 15 9 13 11 12 18 3 5 12 19 25 76.00
Coliadinae 6 5 5 3 4 5 2 4 5 8 10 80.00
Pierinae 9 7 5 4 3 10 3 1 7 16 22 72.73
Pieridae 15 12 10 7 7 15 5 5 12 24 32 75.00
Riodininae 1 - 1 1 2 5 - - 2 6 10 60.00
Curitinae 1 1 1 1 1 1 - - 1 1 1 100.00
Lycaeninae 50 40 42 37 44 93 27 23 27 136 210 64.76
Lycaenidae 52 41 44 39 47 99 27 23 30 143 221 64.71
Libytheinae - - - - - 1 - - - 1 2 50.00
Ithomiinae 1 1 - 2 1 2 - - 1 3 7 42.86
Danainae 13 8 8 12 8 14 9 7 8 24 26 92.31
Morphinae 5 - 5 3 5 9 2 3 7 13 16 81.25
Satyrinae 17 1 7 10 15 23 3 3 13 35 43 81.40
Charaxinae 3 2 2 1 3 3 - - 3 3 3 100.00
Apaturinae 3 1 2 1 3 3 1 1 1 4 5 80.00
Nymphalinae 18 10 13 16 22 22 5 10 18 30 34 88.24
Heliconiinae 8 5 4 7 6 8 3 2 8 11 13 84.62
Nymphalidae 68 28 41 52 63 85 23 26 59 124 149 83.22
Papilionoidea 150 90 108 109 129 217 58 59 113 310 427 72.60
% of records 48.39 29.03 34.84 36.16 41.61 70.00 18.71 19.03 36.46 100    
% of Exp. N. 35.13 21.08 25.29 25.53 30.21 50.82 13.58 13.82 26.46 72.60    

 

Survey in Fak-Fak
by Henk van Mastrigt

From 2 till 10 May 2005 five amateur entomologists were collecting and observing Papilionoidea in the surrounding of Fak-Fak, Onin Peninsula, at three localities: Air Besar (10 m), Werba (60 m) and Kokas km 19 (800 m). The following results can be reported:
· 150 species Papilionoidea were found, which is high in comparison with other surveys (110-140 species), which represent: 15 Papilionidae, 15 Pieridae, 52 Lycaenidae and 68 Nymphalidae.
· The weather during the survey was poor: lots of rain and less sun. A second survey will be held in October 2007, hopefully in better circumstances.
· Nevertheless quite a lot of species were found, endemic in the Onin Peninsula or West Papua.
· Three species were found new to the collection in Jayapura (K.S.P.).
· At Werba 103 species were found, at Air Besar 92 and at KM 19 to Kokas 85 species. Kokas was poor in Nymphalids (16 species less), although it had much more Satyrinae than the other two places. The richness at Werba and Air Besar was due to the larger numbers of Papilionidae, Pieridae and Lycaenidae.
· 69 Species were found at all three localities; at Air Besar and Werba 7 species; at Air Besar and Kokas also 7 species and at Werba and Kokas 10 species.
· From the 57 species exclusively found at one locality 31 species were found at Kokas KM 19, 17 species at Werba and 9 species at Air Besar.

 

 

Butterflies in the surrounding of Campus UNCEN Waena
By Evie L. Warikar and Daawia

 

Background

The Cyclops Reserve close to Jayapura (22.500 ha), with a high endemism of butterflies and other animals (Petocz, 1987), is under continous pressure by the increasing population, for housing and gardening, which results in declining numbers of butterflies over the last twenty years (Van Mastrigt & Rosariyanto, 2005).
Data on diversity of butterfly species at the forest around the Campus of Uncen Waena is not complete yet, but based on Ulim (2000) 21 species of Papilionoidea were registered: 5 species Papilionidae, 1 species Pieridae and 15 species Nymphalidae. Banuaty (2005) reported 11 species of Papilionidae, a reason for further surveys.

Results

Within 15 days (between 13 May and 24 Juni 2006) 100 species were found: 12 species Papilionidae, 5 Pieridae, 24 Lycaenidae and 59 Nymphalidae. According to habitat, most species are found along river sides (83), in the secondary forest 51 species and in the grass land 46 species. The presence of a high number of food plants for caterpillars and butterflies, water and the penetration of sun light have a positive impact on the diversity of butterflies in the area.

 

 

 


Edition IV: April-June 2007

Editorial
In this number a student is reporting her experience during the practical training at Ambaidiru, Japen. Besides that three other reports on experiences during surveys at the Reserve Wondiwoi (Wandammen Mts), at Mokwam, Arfak Mts and at Desa Sandundi, North Biak.

Practical training at Ambaidiru Village, Serui
By Beatrix Wanma

A student of the Biological Department of the UNCEN has to do a practical training and I made the choice to join the Entomological Workgroup (KEP) on their survey to Ambaidiru, Serui (Japen), an island I did not visit before.
During the preparation we met Vincent Kalkman and Hans Huibreghts who were invited to present introductions on dragonflies/damselflies and beetles, and did some training in the field.
At July 5th we arrived at Ambaidiru, which environment varies from 650 to 1.400 m above sea level. The inventory on insects contents butterflies, dragon- and damselflies, and beetles. I was involved at the inventory of butterflies. During 15 days (4-19 July) we collected and observed 129 species of the Superfamily Papilionoidea, including 12 Papilionidae, 7 Pieridae, 47 Lycaenidae and 63 Nymphalidae.
Back in Jayapura I had to finish my training and was active in the collection room helping with identifying and setting.
The experience I got will be useful for my survey at Merauke later this year.

 

 

Old memories in the Wondiwoi Mountains Reserve
By Edy Michelis Rosariyanto

 

This is about the trip I made for surveying butterflies at Wondiwoi Mountains Reserve in 1996, when I was finishing my studies at the Forestry Faculty, at Manokwari.
My first plan was to visit Duhubea village, Arfak Mts, as I observed there many beautiful butterflies I did not see before, but after consultation with Br. Henk we moved to the Wondowoi Rerserve, as nearly no data are available from that area.
In the writing of my essay I was guided by Mr. Alexander Yoku and Mr. Wasaraka, and in the field and during identification I was assisted by Br. Henk van Mastrigt.
During our one week trip we moved very slowly as the route has to be made with using a parang and after four days we reached 1,750 m, an altitude which can be reached at the Cyclops Mts. in one day only. During that week we had a lot of rain and did hardly see any butterfly. It was also clear that we took another trail than the expedition many years ago.
I feel the challenge to return at that spot to get known whether the species collected before are still there.
The result of this survey can be found in my essay: “Keragaman Jenis Kupu-kupu Pada Beberapa Ketinggian Tempat di Cagar Alam Pegunungan Wondiboi” (unpublished).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Survey at Mokwam Village, Kabupaten Manokwari
By Rinto Herry Mambrasar

This survey was organized in order to get data for the essay of Mosaba Uma Duwiri, a student at the Papua State University (UNIPA) at Manokwari, who did her practicum at the insect laboratory of K.S.P. in Jayapura. She was accompanied by Mrs. Rawati Panjaitan, teacher of biology at UNIPA, three other UNIPA students and Rinto H. Mambrasar.
The village Mokwam (1,400 m) we reached by car from Manokwari, in about three hours passing 66 km and we arrived there in wet and cold weather (18º C).
Several aspects of the forest are used by local people in various ways:
· Tourists will come to see the various species of birds; however many specimens were also used for consumption.
· Also the meat of tree- and ground-couscous, tree kangaroo, and ekidna were used for consumption.
· Special kinds of timber are used for building houses and meeting rooms.
· Bark is used to close the walls in the houses and for making bags (noken).
· Many plants are used as various medicines.
· Bamboo is used in various ways, as floors and walls in houses, as fence, as water laid and for transportation.
The survey resulted in 83 species of butterflies: 8 Papilionidae, 17 Pieridae, 33 Lycaenidae and 25 Nymphalidae. According to the elevation 37 species were reported at 1,000 m, 28 species at 1,400 m and 18 species at 1,800 m. Most species were found along riversides and in old garden areas.
The way in which people use the forest has a negative impact on flora and fauna, so that some protection should be useful.
The total result is available in the following essay: Duwiri, Mosaba Uma. 2007. Keragaman dan penyebaran Kupu-kupu Superfamili Papilionoidea, Di Kampung Mokwam, Distrik Minyambouw, Provinsi Papua Barat (unpublished).

(photo: Piet Zumkehr. Showing forest being destroyed)

 

 

 

 

Desa Sansundi, North Biak
By Rinto Herry Mambrasar

Edy M. Rosariyanto, Yohanes Don Bosco Maro and Rinto H. Mambrasar visited Desa Sansundi, North Biak, in order to survey butterflies in the North Biak Reserve.
The local people are fishermen, doing also some gardening for vegetables and fruits. Besides that they collect shelves which result in IDR 45.000 to IDR 50.000 a kg. The people are aware of their task to protect and control the forest to keep it in a good condition.
In the past three large families stayed together in one village. However, to be closer to their own gardens after the tsunami in 1996, they built three villages.
The survey was done in June 2006 and the result is not published and became part of KSP.

 


Edition III: January-March 2007

Editorial
This number is focused on some areas where insects are on the daily menu of local people who usually have good knowledge of ‘their’ insects.

‘Debetkun’ as an alternative source of protein
By Euniche Ramanday

In Papua are over 50,000 species of insects, including over 30,000 beetles (Petocz, 1987). About 50% of the insects is rich in protein. The local society in Papua is using several insects, e.g. the Sago larva or ‘debetkun’ (in Moi language: debet = Sago; kun = larva), Rhyncophorus bilineatus. This beetle is breeding in the cut Sago trees (Metroxylon spp.) which have ‘pati’, the heart of the tree after the tree is cut. The larvae of this beetle cannot live in trees without pati, in trees still in good condition and usually do not form pests.
“Debetkun” is eaten raw or can be fried, cooked or smoked or prepared in another way. In markets these larvae are expensive. Collecting these larvae is helping the farmers not becoming pests. However, it would be a good idea to investigate the possibilities to farm these insects, becoming an alternative source of protein for the society in Papua.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hunting bugs in Pass Valley
By Herlina Menufandu

The author of this article collected beetles together with children of the Yali tribe at Pass Valley in 2005. Suddenly the children shouted and after asking what there were doing they explained playing collecting “Babukulit” which is Nezara viridula Linnaeus (Hemiptera, Heteroptera). This bug really smells and is called “smelling animal”, however different from “sticking bites” which were members of Cimicidae. However the ‘smelling bugs” are members of the Miridae, Reduviidae or Pentatomidae family. Nezara viridula, which is a pest, occurs in various colors: metallic green and metallic blue. This bug is a delicacy for the local people, more than Behrensiellus glabratus Pascoe which also is a common pest.
Many insects (as cicadas, beetles, bugs and May flies (Ephemeroptera)) will never be overwhelming, as they will be collected by local people for their daily meal.
Papuans which were often said to destroy nature realize that they depend on their environment for their daily life, and are better ‘conservators’ than many people from outside. More surveys should be done in order to know what insects are daily consumption for local people in the various areas of Papua.

 

 

 

‘Tonggeret’ delicacy for Papua people
By Henk van Mastrigt

During a visit to Timeepa and Modio in the Weyland Mountains in 1979 I realized that cicadas were the real delicacy for local people. At the next visit I understood that ‘waine’, the most delicious cicada, has a two years season and was not present during my visit. This Ekagi tribe in the Mapia area has good knowledge about cicada for which they have many local words which fit with the scientific names.
Besides cicada – food for various tribes in the interior of Papua – also grasshoppers and large moths are collected as food. Although I never studied insects as food for local people, based on experience can be concluded that
· Cosmopsaltria are a delicacy for many tribes
· Other insects and spiders are also eaten, but are second choice
· Many insects are eatable, but collecting large ones is more efficient
· Using lamps makes collecting easy, so people became more active when electricity is available.
With many choices of other food cicada will not be collected by people anymore, but the praying mantis (Mantoidea) also loves cicadas as a meal.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indigenous knowledge about beetles by the Yali tribe
By Herlina Menufandu

Dividing Coleoptera into families and groups is by various entomologists far from uniform. The Yali tribe has its own vision too and distinguishes two large groups: Hombolo and Boleag (beetles with horns, long antennae or large mandibles). Males of Lucanidae, Scarabidae, Cerambycidae, Curculionidae and Passalidae are included in Boleag, while females of Lucanidae and Scarabidae are included in Hombolo.
However, both groups only concern the eatable insects, so many beetles are not included.
The Yali people have also names for some families like “fulug” (Passalidae) and “fua” (Curculionidae), for genera like “bomboli” (Rhyncophorus sp.), or species like “singgabit” (Rhinoscapha richteri) and “gulangge jangge” (Behrensiellus glabratus).
The last one was very dominant during our visit and is often found at Pipperaceae and Verbenadeae.
A total of 115 different species were collected from 33 families. The highest number of species was found of the family Curculionidae (43 species).
Total results are presented in a training report of Herlina Menufandu (UNCEN, 2005).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Survey on food plants of larvae and butterflies of the Papilionidae at the Reserve Cyclops Mountains, Jayapura
By Dra. Daawia M.Sc. and Dra. Supeni Sufaati M. Sc.

This survey was made on three locations at the foot of the Cyclops Mountains, from March to October 2005. The method was according to Cayabyab (1993) and resulted in the following conclusions.
Larvae of Papilionidae use several leaves as food from Annonaceae, Rutaceae, Lauraceae and Araliaceae. Larvae of Atrophaneura polydorus, Ornithoptera priamus and Troides oblongomaculatus eat Aristolochia tagala (Aristolochiaceae). Larvae of Graphium species like leaves of Lauraceae and Annonaceae, while larvae Papilio species prefer leaves of Rutaceaea and Araliaceae. Larvae of the genera Graphium and Papilio accept other leaves in gardens than in the forest: i.e. Annona muricata instead of Litsea fulva (Graphium) and Citrus spp. instead of Micromelum minutum and Toddalia asiatica (Papilio).
In the forest butterflies of Papilionidae are fouraging at different flowering bushes than in the gardens, but they all belong to the families of Verbenaceae, Malvaceae, Rubiaceae, Zingiberaceae, Asteraceae and Sterculiaceae.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Edition II: October-December 2006

 

Editorial
The enthousiasm of the Kelompok Entomologi Papua (KEP), Entomological Workgroup, lifted the number of pages of our magazine to 20.
The last three months were filled with activities: surveys to Supiori, Japen and Borme (Star Mountains) and the BIOCON in Port Moresby (Papua New Guinea).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Survey on south side of Mt Bonsupiori at Supiori
By Evie L. Warikar

Since 1982 an area of 42,000 ha has become a reserve, with a highly diverse flora and fauna, including many insects not yet described.
In the survey an altitude of only 600 meter was reached, although to top is at 1,034 meter. In an area of about 5 km2 during 29 days in the period March-May 2004, 110 species of the superfamily Papilionoidea were collected: 11 Papilionidae, 7 Pieridae, 39 Lycaenidae and 53 Nymphalidae. As endemics can be mentioned Dicallaneura princessa, Deudorix maudei (Lycaenidae), Euploea tripunctata, E. albicosta, Taenaris scylla, Cirrochroa imperatrix (Nymphalidae) and a Mycalesis sp. which is probably a new species.
Full results are presented in a final paper of Evie L. Warikar (2004), to graduate at the Cenderawasih University in Jayapura.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Start Survey about diversity of beetles at Desa Maribu, Kabupaten Jayapura
By Euniche (Ika) Ramanday

In the environment of Jayapura about 38,670 ha Sago (Metroxylon spp.) is present, 24,670 Sago forest and the rest in plantations. Because of the decrease of Sago forest at Maribo, which is the Sago centre in the Sentani area, a survey was held on the Sago beetle at Maribo Tua, at 120 meter above sea level, one of the three villages of Maribo, where the Sago forest is still in a good condition.
As a result of six months surveying, 11 species beetles were found: 4 Curculionidae, 2 Lucanidae, 2 Histeridae, 2 Chrysomelidae and a single Hydrophylidae species. Only two species were identified: Rhyncophorus bilineatus and Dactylosternum dytiscoides.
Full results of this survey were presented by Euniche Ramanday in a final paper to graduate at Cenderawasih University (2005).

 

 

 

 

Survey at Marina Valen
By Yohanes Bosco Maro

The Mamberamo area is proposed to become a reserve by Petocz (1987), because of its high biodiversity. Conservation International wants to survey this area and invited Br. Henk van Mastrigt, who on his turn invited Yohanes Don Bosco Maro and Rinto H. Mambrasar to accompany him on that trip.
Marina Valen, located about 2º 23’ S and 138º 12’ E, has a population of 194 inhabitans, surviving with gardening, hunting and fishing. Four habitat were selected for the survey: 1. primary forest at Mt Hacauwa (540 m), 2. side of the River Kena (60 m), 3. primary forest (120 m) and garden area (80 m).
In 18 days 117 different butterfly species (Papilionoidea) were recorded: 10 Papilionidae, 10 Pieridae, 45 Lycaenidae and 52 Nymphalidae.
The threat to nature in this area at the moment is only the hunting and fishing by natives. Full results of this survey is presented in three papers: a training report, a final paper by Yohanes Bosco Maro (2004 and 2005) and a training report by Rinto H. Mambrasar (2004).

 

 

 

 

 

 

8th New Guinea Biology Conference
By Henk van Mastrigt

At the 8th New Guinea Biology Conference (Port Moresby (PNG), 26-28 September, 2006) 38 presentations were held, three by key-note speakers and 35 results of surveys. Five presentations were concerning entomological items, of which four were results of the New Guinea Research Center in Madang. The kind of surveys will be good examples for students and teachers in Papua.
Markus Manumbor - Studying insects communities in PNG rainforests: a parataxonomist approach.
Darren Bito - Geographic variability of moth communities on the alien tree Spathodea campanulata in New Guinea and Bismarck Archipelago.
Steven Sau - Host specialization of leaf miners in lowland rainforest.
Elvis Tamtiai - Geographic distribution of Lepidoptera in PNG rainforest.
Leontine Baje - Host specialization of sap sucking insects in a lowland rainforest.
More information via www.entu.cas.cz/png/ or email address binatangi@datec.net.pg of the New Guinea Research Center in Madang (PO Box 604 MADANG, PNG).

 


Edition I: July-September 2006

INTRODUCTION

Editorial
The editorial mentioned this edition as first number of a new magazine, edited and distributed by Kelompok Entomologi Papua (KEP), Entomological Workgroup in Papua and displays entomological information about Papua (formerly Irian Jaya Province), to enlarge the knowledge of the biodiversity of our nature, in order to be able to make conservation possible.

History
The first survey by Henk van Mastrigt with a student of the local University of Cenderawasih (UNCEN) was in 1996 to the Wandammen Mountains. Since 2001 Henk has been accompaning students in one or more surveys yearly. The collected specimens are in his private collection in Jayapura, now named Koleksi Serangga Papua (KSP, Papua Insect Collection), with over 42,000 specimens. Participants of the surveys became a member of a workgroup on entomology, which held its first meeting on November 9th 2005 and its second meeting on May 27th 2006, in which was decided to start a magazine, to have an own telephone number and e-mail address and to intensify its activities. So, the date of that second meeting was chosen as our birthday.

Vision and mission
KEP wants to survey the insect fauna of Papua, in order to know its biodiversity which will help to conserve Papua’s nature, in cooperation with various organizations and private persons (specialists in entomology) from inside and outside the country. Famous organizations as the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and Conservation International (CI) have been working on this item from years and years, but their focus is more the larger animals as mamalia, birds and reptiles.
KEP also wants to provide information to above mentioned organizations, about endemism and results from ‘hot spots’, in order to preserve Papua’s forests. Information we forward to websites a.o. www.delias-butterflies.co.uk and www.papua-insects.nl and can be found in papers of students.
At the same time KEP wants to help teachers and students of the UNCEN and other universities in Papua, and support working at inventories and surveys on insects in Papua.
The results of these cooperations will help KEP to determine the ‘hot spots’ of biodiversity in Papua.

Plans for the next future
After the publication of “Buku Panduan Kupu-kupu” (see book corner) on butterflies from the Mamberamo area to the Cyclops Mountains, the idea was to publish more field guides from other areas in Papua. The Schouten Islands north of Papua (Numfor, Supiori, Biak, Japen and some other smaller islands) will be next, followed by the Birdshead Peninsula, including the Peninsula Raja Ampat, Tamrau and Arfak Mountains, Onin and Wandammen Peninsula. The priority of surveys is not only depending from the above mentioned targets, but also from the origin of the local students, invitations of organizations and sponsoring.

Content and purpose of magazine
In Suara Serangga Papua KEP want to publish – step by step – results of entomological surveys in the past and about other papers on entomology in Papua, and report the results of new surveys.
The editors will receive short articles from members of KEP and other interested people about themes which contribute to the entomological knowledge on Papua.
The magazine will be distributed to non-governmental organisations (NGO’s) in Papua interested in ecology and entomology, to governmental departments, universities and highschools, private subscribers and the members of KEP.

SURVEYS

Survey on the Pantai Timur Islands
By Henk van Mastrigt

Six students of the UNCEN visited the small islands in the district Pantai Timur (139º07’/139º30’ longitude, -1º58’/-2º07’ latitude) in the period July 15 – August 12, 2002. Three students visited Wakde, Masi-masi and Yamna, the others Podena, Yarson and Anus. The islands vary in size from 0.3 km2 (Podena) to 3 km2 (Wakde).
A total of 59 species Lepidoptera were collected, of which 53 species on the three westernmost islands (Yamna being the richest with 40 species) and 37 species on the three eastern islands (Anus being the richest with 29 species).
The results of the survey of the western islands are reported by Alfrets Randang (2003), that of the eastern islands are reported by Henoch Wanggori (2004), who also made a comparisson between these results and those of the Mamberamo area, where once 129 species were collected: 26 species (44%) from the Pantai Timur Islands were not reported from the Mamberamo survey in the surrounding of Dabra.

 

 

 

Survey on the Kumamba Islands

By Henk van Mastrigt

Six students of UNCEN visited the Kumamba Islands, north of Sarmi, from July 16th till August 12, 2002. The survey focussed on the population of Papilionoidea, mainly on the largest island Liki. The other two islands, Lambutu and Armo, were visited as well.
A total of 60 species Lepidoptera were recorded: 52 on Liki, 4 on Lambutu and 22 on Armo. It comprises 4 Papilionidae, 5 Pieridae, 27 Lycaenidae and 24 Nymphalidae.
Remarkable was the absence of Graphium species and the high abundancy of Leptotes plinius at only a small area along the coast. Cyrestes acilia appeared to be very different from specimens on the mainland of New Guinea, and finally, Cepora perimale was only found on the smallest island, Lambutu, not on the other islands! Unfortunately the results are not yet reported.

 

 

 

 

 

Survey on the island Numfor
By Rinto H. Mambrasar

In the months July and August in 2005 a survey was held on Numfor Island, with the purpose of collecting data of Papilionoidea and to make a comparisson between the distributions inside and outside the proposed nature reserve area (ca 1000 ha). The island Numfor is 391 km2 and has a maximum altidude of 200 meters. Its geographic position is between 134º47’ and 135º00’ longitude, and -0º57’ and -1º08’ latitude. There are about 9000 inhabitans.
The island was divided in six transects for observations, three of them outside the nature reserve (secundairy forest with gardens, a coastline and villages) and three inside the nature reserve (primary forest, secundairy forest with old gardens and secundairy forest with young gardens).
In 26 days 90 species of Lepidoptera were recorded: 9 Papilionidae, 12 Pieridae, 41 Lycaenidae and 28 Nymphalidae. Only one species was found exclusively outside the reserve.
Threat of the biodiversity is caused by illegal deforestation by the local people, who also catch many birds. The establishment of many cocoa plantations and plans of a governmental restructurization, with the increase of cultivation, form serious threats to the flora and fauna of the island.

A complete report of the results of this survey is published in the essay of Rinto H. Mambrasar, to accomplishment of his study at the biological department of the FMIPA at the University of Cenderawasih in Jayapura.